Will ‘Decentralized Finance’ Be the Next Disruptive Technology?
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,436,707 (+0.82%)       Melbourne $958,938 (-0.18%)       Brisbane $805,276 (+0.20%)       Adelaide $743,261 (+0.57%)       Perth $641,111 (+1.35%)       Hobart $739,768 (-1.32%)       Darwin $641,804 (-0.09%)       Canberra $971,787 (-1.13%)       National $936,660 (+0.16%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $694,570 (-0.33%)       Melbourne $471,297 (-0.44%)       Brisbane $430,588 (-1.62%)       Adelaide $353,294 (-0.18%)       Perth $357,545 (+0.46%)       Hobart $558,931 (+4.60%)       Darwin $356,380 (-2.21%)       Canberra $476,932 (+0.93%)       National $489,111 (+0.53%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,093 (-72)       Melbourne 13,872 (+186)       Brisbane 10,770 (+38)       Adelaide 3,078 (+82)       Perth 9,971 (+180)       Hobart 911 (+13)       Darwin 300 (-7)       Canberra 996 (+8)       National 49,991 (+428)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,400 (-137)       Melbourne 7,842 (-9)       Brisbane 2,243 (-20)       Adelaide 542 (+7)       Perth 2,413 (+1)       Hobart 156 (+3)       Darwin 371 (-4)       Canberra 529 (+5)       National 22,496 (-154)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $660 (+$10)       Melbourne $500 (+$10)       Brisbane $560 (+$10)       Adelaide $510 (+$10)       Perth $550 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $650 (+$25)       Canberra $700 (+$5)       National $593 (+$9)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $600 ($0)       Melbourne $450 (+$5)       Brisbane $500 ($0)       Adelaide $403 (+$3)       Perth $470 ($0)       Hobart $473 (-$3)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 ($0)       National $508 (+$)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,525 (+243)       Melbourne 7,106 (-5)       Brisbane 3,920 (+102)       Adelaide 1,146 (+39)       Perth 1,623 (+85)       Hobart 243 (+11)       Darwin 102 (-7)       Canberra 588 (+44)       National 21,253 (+512)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,070 (+376)       Melbourne 5,906 (+117)       Brisbane 1,516 (+27)       Adelaide 327 (+5)       Perth 673 (-3)       Hobart 86 (+5)       Darwin 232 (+7)       Canberra 662 (+66)       National 17,472 (+600)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.39% (↑)      Melbourne 2.71% (↑)      Brisbane 3.62% (↑)      Adelaide 3.57% (↑)        Perth 4.46% (↓)     Hobart 3.87% (↑)      Darwin 5.27% (↑)      Canberra 3.75% (↑)      National 3.29% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 4.49% (↑)      Melbourne 4.97% (↑)      Brisbane 6.04% (↑)      Adelaide 5.92% (↑)        Perth 6.84% (↓)       Hobart 4.40% (↓)     Darwin 8.03% (↑)        Canberra 6.11% (↓)       National 5.40% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 1.6% (↑)      Melbourne 1.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.5% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 1.0% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.5% (↑)      National 1.2%    (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 2.3% (↑)      Melbourne 2.8% (↑)      Brisbane 1.2% (↑)      Adelaide 0.7% (↑)      Perth 1.3% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.3% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)      National 2.1%   (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 30.4 (↓)       Melbourne 29.7 (↓)       Brisbane 36.6 (↓)       Adelaide 25.3 (↓)     Perth 41.0 (↑)        Hobart 32.2 (↓)       Darwin 33.8 (↓)       Canberra 28.3 (↓)       National 32.2 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 33.0 (↓)       Melbourne 30.1 (↓)       Brisbane 35.1 (↓)       Adelaide 29.4 (↓)     Perth 43.7 (↑)        Hobart 26.9 (↓)     Darwin 44.0 (↑)      Canberra 31.9 (↑)        National 34.3 (↓)           
Share Button

Will ‘Decentralized Finance’ Be the Next Disruptive Technology?

The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) latest Global Financial Stability Report highlights myriad risks for the global financial system.

By TOM TAULLI
Wed, Jun 29, 2022 1:42pmGrey Clock 3 min

The International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) latest Global Financial Stability Report highlights myriad risks for the global financial system. They include the war in Ukraine, high debt, and soaring inflation.

But the report also warned about the impact of decentralized finance, or DeFi, an emerging set of financial services applications that are based on blockchain and other crypto technologies and don’t involve banks other traditional financial intermediaries

Citing possible systemic risk, the IMF wants governments to impose regulations because, the report says, DeFi results in the “buildup of leverage, and is particularly vulnerable to market, liquidity, and cyber risks.”

DeFi may not be a mainstream vehicle yet, but that doesn’t mean financial advisors don’t need to know about it.

What is DeFi?

It’s a kind of financial application that uses “smart contracts,” to operate on a blockchain platform, usually Ethereum. These software programs allow for fully automated, peer-to-peer financial transactions without intermediaries like banks or brokers, which generally means faster settlements of trades.

“With DeFi, users are able to perform most functions that a bank can,” says Jeremy Almond, founder and CEO of Paystand, a B2B payments platform. “This includes earning interest, borrowing, lending, buying insurance, trading derivatives, and trading assets.”

Supporters of DeFi say it offers the potential to democratize financial services for the unbanked. This is a key reason the Federal Reserve is looking at creating a digital currency.

The world currently has around 1.7 billion people who are unbanked, according to Yubo Ruan, founder and CEO of DeFi provider Parallel Finance. “Some of the reasons include a lack of government-issued IDs, problems with credit history, restrictive bank requirements, or a lack of banking infrastructure within a country.”

How easy is it to use?

It can actually be cumbersome. You need several applications to accomplish what may seem like routine transactions if done at a bank, and the jargon and concepts can get complicated.

“A combination of highly technical requirements, high fees, and confusing user interfaces are putting off potential users,” says Jackie Bona, CEO of Valora, a mobile crypto wallet. “This is making it difficult for people to get started in DeFi, scaring away those who need these apps the most.”

What are the risks?

According to Archie Ravishankar, CEO and founder of mobile banking app Cogni: “Regular consumers in this space lack the regulatory protections they’re accustomed to in traditional finance.” So if you lose money, you have no consumer protection, such as the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. True, you could bring a lawsuit, but the target DeFi organization may be an offshore entity.

Another issue is volatility. Just look at so-called stablecoins such as Luna. Within a week, its value plunged from $80 to virtually zero, tantamount to a run on the bank.

So should financial advisors suggest clients avoid these applications?

Generally, the answer is yes. DeFi is an emerging category of finance and it can be difficult to perform due diligence on new and decentralized technologies. Even those applications that are backed by venture capitalists have seen breaches.

When it comes to clients, DeFi is for those that have a high tolerance for risk. And if they are interested in investing, they should allocate a small part of their portfolio to it.

Can DeFi disrupt traditional financial services?

Even if it takes only a relatively small portion of the global market, the impact would be substantial.

“DeFi certainly has the potential to disrupt traditional finance across the board, and in some ways it already has—on a small scale so far,” says Liam Kelly, Europe news editor for Decrypt, a cryptocurrency news site. But he adds, “a lot of this hinges on breakthroughs in scalability and cutting reasonable lines between things like centralization and decentralization or opaqueness and transparency. Another possibility is that these technologies simply get absorbed by financial institutions to a point where to the consumer, nothing has changed at your brokerage account, except now on the back end it’s running on Ethereum or another blockchain network.”

MOST POPULAR

Chris Dixon, a partner who led the charge, says he has a ‘very long-term horizon’

Americans now think they need at least $1.25 million for retirement, a 20% increase from a year ago, according to a survey by Northwestern Mutual

Related Stories
Money
Andy Warhol’s Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II Sets Auction Record
By FANG BLOCK 02/12/2022
Money
Products Made With Captured Greenhouse Gas Are Reaching Commercial Scale
By DIETER HOLGER 01/12/2022
Money
How Crypto’s Collapse May Have Done the Economy a Favour
By GREG IP 25/11/2022
Andy Warhol’s Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II Sets Auction Record
By FANG BLOCK
Fri, Dec 2, 2022 2 min

Andy Warhol’s portrait of the late Queen Elizabeth II sold for C$1.14 million (US$855,000) at an auction last week, setting a record price for an editioned print by the Pop artist, the Canadian auction house Heffel said.

Warhol created the screenprint in 1985 based on a photograph taken by Peter Grugeon at Windsor Castle in 1975, which was released in 1977 on the occasion of the Queen’s Silver Jubilee, according to Heffel.

Queen Elizabeth II died in September at the age of 96 after a seven-decade reign, making her one of the longest-reigning monarchs in history.

The portrait features the then-reigning Queen wearing the diamond-and-pearl Grand Duchess Vladimir Tiara and a matching necklace, and a blue sash pinned with a medallion with a miniature portrait of her father, George VI, on regal blue background. The outline of the portrait was accentuated by diamond dust, which glimmered in the light.

This print is one of only two editions signed as “HC” for Hors d’Commerce (not for sale) aside from the 30 numbered editions with this colour scheme and diamond dust, according to Heffel.

The consignor acquired the print circa 1996 from Bob Rennie, a prominent Vancouver businessman and collector, according to Heffel, which declined to disclose the identities of the consignor and the buyer.

Offered as a highlight at Heffel’s 85-lot auction of Post-War and contemporary art on Nov. 24 in Toronto, the print realised a price more than double its presale estimate, and was the highest achieved by an editioned print by Warhol, the auction house said.

The previous auction record for an editioned Warhol print was for a piece from the same edition, also in the regal blue coloursold in September at Sotheby’s for £554,400 (US$662,000), according to Heffel.

The most expensive Warhol work is his portrait of Marilyn Monroe, Shot Sage Blue Marilyn, which was acquired by gallerist Larry Gagosian at a Christie’s auction in May for US$195 million, marking a record price for a work by an American artist at auction.

MOST POPULAR
Darwin

Sales volumes and median prices on the rise in the N.T

Pixelated Facebook

Content moderation rules used to be a question of taste. Now, they can determine a service’s prospects for survival.

0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop