Five steps to head off mortgage stress
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,656,430 (+0.65%)       Melbourne $994,677 (+0.27%)       Brisbane $978,777 (+0.15%)       Adelaide $878,311 (-0.89%)       Perth $857,374 (-0.27%)       Hobart $742,122 (-0.64%)       Darwin $666,990 (-0.54%)       Canberra $987,062 (-0.84%)       National $1,052,287 (+0.12%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750,216 (+0.60%)       Melbourne $492,069 (-0.93%)       Brisbane $539,184 (+0.19%)       Adelaide $444,416 (-2.21%)       Perth $457,888 (+0.17%)       Hobart $527,154 (-0.12%)       Darwin $344,216 (+0.22%)       Canberra $504,424 (-0.33%)       National $530,515 (-0.07%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,120 (-121)       Melbourne 15,095 (-40)       Brisbane 7,990 (0)       Adelaide 2,438 (+11)       Perth 6,327 (-40)       Hobart 1,294 (-21)       Darwin 238 (+1)       Canberra 1,020 (+13)       National 44,522 (-197)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,780 (+4)       Melbourne 8,222 (-18)       Brisbane 1,619 (+1)       Adelaide 396 (-4)       Perth 1,599 (+9)       Hobart 213 (+10)       Darwin 400 (-6)       Canberra 1,003 (-24)       National 22,232 (-28)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 (+$20)       Melbourne $610 (+$10)       Brisbane $640 (+$3)       Adelaide $610 (+$10)       Perth $670 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 (-$10)       National $669 (+$5)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $775 (+$15)       Melbourne $550 ($0)       Brisbane $630 (-$20)       Adelaide $500 (+$5)       Perth $628 (+$8)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $500 (-$15)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $591 (+$)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,426 (-22)       Melbourne 5,783 (+92)       Brisbane 4,042 (+149)       Adelaide 1,399 (+12)       Perth 2,345 (+25)       Hobart 383 (-2)       Darwin 94 (-10)       Canberra 595 (-9)       National 20,067 (+235)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,835 (+301)       Melbourne 4,537 (+107)       Brisbane 2,209 (+57)       Adelaide 391 (-8)       Perth 741 (-7)       Hobart 137 (+5)       Darwin 152 (-14)       Canberra 612 (+17)       National 17,614 (+458)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.57% (↑)      Melbourne 3.19% (↑)      Brisbane 3.40% (↑)      Adelaide 3.61% (↑)      Perth 4.06% (↑)      Hobart 3.85% (↑)      Darwin 5.46% (↑)        Canberra 3.58% (↓)     National 3.30% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.37% (↑)      Melbourne 5.81% (↑)        Brisbane 6.08% (↓)     Adelaide 5.85% (↑)      Perth 7.13% (↑)      Hobart 4.44% (↑)        Darwin 7.55% (↓)     Canberra 5.88% (↑)      National 5.80% (↑)             HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 30.3 (↓)       Melbourne 31.5 (↓)       Brisbane 31.7 (↓)       Adelaide 25.7 (↓)       Perth 35.4 (↓)     Hobart 33.7 (↑)      Darwin 36.2 (↑)        Canberra 32.0 (↓)     National 32.1 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 31.3 (↓)       Melbourne 31.9 (↓)       Brisbane 32.1 (↓)       Adelaide 24.8 (↓)       Perth 38.7 (↓)       Hobart 37.6 (↓)     Darwin 46.5 (↑)        Canberra 39.2 (↓)     National 35.3 (↑)            
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Five steps to head off mortgage stress

Are you ready to weather further interest rate increases? Follow this quick checklist

By Kanebridge News
Mon, Aug 15, 2022 9:12amGrey Clock 3 min

Two weeks after the RBA’s fourth consecutive rate rise with experts predicting a peak of 3.35 percent from its current 1.85 percent, and the reality of mortgage stress is starting to hit a little close to home for some. Here,  Louisa Sanghera, founder of broking firm Zippy Financial and creator of the Mum CFOs Money Masterclass Course offers a quick checklist of ways to save money and minimise the mortgage dramas.

1. Talk to your bank or broker

As a rule of thumb, everyone should be able to afford their mortgage repayments. Even when the interest rate sat at 1.69 percent last year, borrowers were being assessed for their capacity to service their mortgages with rates as 5.25 percent and higher. Banks like to have a buffer in place to ensure borrowers can meet their debt servicing rates.

Look at your mortgage now and consider if you can afford to repay it at a rate of 5.5 percent in the near future. If you can’t, visit your broker or bank to make plan. It may mean restructuring your mortgage over a longer term or moving to interest only on part or all of your mortgage for a while. Your bank or lender will have financial hardship policies in place to support you – the earlier you reach out, the more options you’ll have.

2. Shop around

It only takes a few minutes to do a quick search online to compare prices. You’d be surprised by all the savings to be had from your everyday staples like petrol and groceries to big ticket items like fridges and appliances. Ask for a discount or at the very least price matching if you buy in store. Consumer advocacy groups like Choice and Canstar Blue are great for finding the best value for your money deals with hundreds of reviews to help you compare products.

3. Avoid the lazy tax

Reassess all your utilities – electricity, gas, phone, internet, and insurance and see where you can cut back. For example, if your phone usage is a lot lower than what your plan accommodates, consider downgrading to something more affordable. Phone companies like Amaysim and Boost have great cheap deals on and use the same lines as Optus and Telstra.

If you haven’t switched providers recently, you could be unwittingly paying hundreds on their standard energy contracts. Do some research to see what’s out there then jump on the phone to your utilities provider to ask for a better rate. Make use of utilities comparison sites and ask them for their cheapest deal. Chances are you’ll come away with a healthy discount to stay with the same provider but if you choose to move providers don’t forget to check for any fees you’d have to pay for leaving.

4. Consolidate your debt

Consolidate any debt you have to eliminate multiple loan fees and get rid of the high interest rates you’re paying on credit cards and loans. Rolling all your debts into one loan means you only need to make one regular repayment at the same interest rate. This means you could potentially pay off your loans and your mortgage faster.

You can add these debts onto your mortgage split in a separate short-term loan to repay at your current mortgage interest rates. Also known as a ‘top up’, a home loan increase allows you to access the equity in your home by either increasing the balance on your loan or creating a separate loan that’s linked to the same property. Consolidating debt has its advantages but you must weigh out its benefits over the long term as it’s likely to result in more interest charged over time. Take a good look at your overall financial position and total costs to work out if the lower interest rate offered by home loans will work out well for you in the long run.

5. Curb discretionary spending

Managing discretionary spending is like flexing a muscle. The more you do it, the more it becomes second nature to you. Australians spend a lot on takeaways and food deliveries spending an average of $40 a week on meal delivery services. Other expenses like taxi rides, entertainment, alcohol, and online shopping tend to add up as well. You can trim the fat by opting to meal plan and eat at home, substitute going out for a fun movie night in and deleting all those shopping apps.

Save yourself from impulse purchases by always making a list and sit on it for a few days. Then you’ll know if you really need it. Don’t browse on shopping sites mindlessly – find other ways to entertain yourself. Things like parks, museums and cultural events are often low or no cost. Not only will your wallet thank you in the end, you might end up being healthier too!



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Boost for World Economy as U.S., Eurozone Accelerate in Tandem

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Global economic growth is becoming more broad based, with surveys indicating that business activity in both the U.S. and the eurozone gained momentum in May.

The eurozone economy contracted in the second half of 2023 following a surge in energy and food prices triggered by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the subsequent rise in interest rates intended to tame that inflation.

By contrast, the U.S. economy expanded strongly over the same period, opening up an unusually wide growth gap with the eurozone. That gap narrowed as the eurozone returned to growth in the first three months of the year, while the U.S. slowed.

However, surveys released Thursday point to a fresh acceleration in the U.S., even as growth in the eurozone strengthened. That bodes well for a global economy that relied heavily on the U.S. for its dynamism in 2023.

The S&P Global Flash U.S. Composite PMI —which gauges activity in the manufacturing and services sectors—rose to 54.4 in May from 51.3 in April, marking a 25-month high and the first time since the beginning of the year that the index hasn’t slowed. A level over 50 indicates expansion in private-sector activity.

“The data put the U.S. economy back on course for another solid gross domestic product gain in the second quarter,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at S&P Global Market Intelligence.

Eurozone business activity in turn increased for the third straight month in May, and at the fastest pace in a year, the surveys suggest. The currency area’s joint composite PMI rose to 52.3 from 51.7.

The uptick was led by powerhouse economy Germany, where continued strength in services and improvement in industry drove activity to its highest level in a year. That helped the manufacturing sector in the bloc as a whole grow closer to recovery, reaching a 15-month peak.

By contrast, surveys of purchasing managers pointed to a slowdown in the U.K. economy following a stronger-than-expected start to the year that saw it outpace the U.S. The survey was released a day after Prime Minister Rishi Sunak called a surprise election for early July, banking on signs of an improved economic outlook to turn around a large deficit in the opinion polls.

Similar surveys pointed to a further acceleration in India’s rapidly-expanding economy, and to a rebound in Japan, where the economy contracted in the first three months of the year. In Australia, the surveys pointed to a slight slowdown in growth during May.

Businesses reported that they were raising their prices at the slowest pace since November, which should reassure the European Central Bank. However, the eurozone continued to add jobs in May, suggesting that wages might not cool as rapidly as the ECB had hoped.

The ECB released figures Thursday that showed wages negotiated by labor unions in the eurozone were 4.7% higher in the first quarter than a year earlier, a faster increase than the 4.5% recorded in the final three months of 2023

The ECB has signalled it will lower its key interest rate in early June, while the Fed is waiting for evidence that a slowdown in inflation will resume after setbacks this year.

Nevertheless, eurozone businesses and households shouldn’t bank on successive cuts to borrowing costs, ECB Vice President Luis de Guindos said. “There is a huge degree of uncertainty,” he said. “We have made no decisions on the number of interest rate cuts or on their size,” he said in an interview published Thursday. “We will see how economic data evolve.”

Continued resilience in the eurozone economy would likely make the ECB more cautious about lowering borrowing costs after its first move, economist Franziska Palmas at Capital Economics wrote in a note. “If the economy continues to hold up well, cuts further ahead may be slower than we had anticipated,” she said.

– Edward Frankl contributed to this story.

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This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

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