The top Australian super funds of 2023 revealed
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
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The top Australian super funds of 2023 revealed

Super funds with aggressive growth strategies delivered the strongest returns

By Bronwyn Allen
Tue, Jan 30, 2024 10:48amGrey Clock 3 min

Impressive share market gains in 2023 boosted the performance of Australian superannuation funds last year. All-growth super funds primarily invested in Australian and international shares delivered an outstanding 13.1 percent return, while conservative super funds containing fewer shares and more defensive assets such as bonds and cash booked a respectable 6.2 percent return.

Chant West has released its annual review of superannuation funds and revealed the top 10 performing funds among those with the median growth strategy. Super investors can choose between several types of strategies depending on their risk tolerance and stage of life. Typically, young Australians may prefer higher growth strategies because they have a longer time horizon to grow their super and can therefore tolerate more risk. Older workers closer to retirement tend to prefer balanced or conservative strategies that aim to preserve capital and deliver lower-risk gains.

Chant West revealed the performance of five different fund strategies common among Australian superannuation funds. Allgrowth super funds, which comprise 96 to 100 percent growth assets such as shares, delivered a median 13.1 return for investors. High-growth super funds with 81 to 95 percent growth assets delivered an 11.4 percent return. Median growth funds with 61 to 80 percent growth assets delivered 9.9 percent. Balanced funds with 41 to 60 percent growth assets returned 8.1 percent and conservative funds with 21 to 40 percent growth assets returned 6.2 percent.

Chant West senior investment research manager Mano Mohankumar said share markets in Australia and overseas performed well in 2023 and this was the biggest factor in super funds’ gains last year.

Mr Mohankumar said: “International shares was the standout asset class with a tremendous 23 percent return over the year, led by the tech sector which benefitted from advancements in AI. While Australian shares didn’t reach the same level, it still delivered a healthy 12.1percent over the same period.

Share market returns include share price growth or capital gains, as well as dividends. Defensive assets also provided solid returns last year, with Australian bonds delivering 5.1 percent, international bonds 5.3 percent and cash 3.9 percent.

The top 10 median growth super funds are listed below, with the returns shown being net of investment fees and taxes but before administration fees and financial advisor commissions.

1. Mine Super Growth (11.8 percent)
2. Vision Super Balanced Growth (11.7 percent)
3. IOOF Balanced Investor Trust (11.2 percent)
4. Aware Super Balanced (11 percent)
5. TWUSUPER Balanced (MySuper) (10.6 percent)
6. HESTA Balanced Growth (10.5 percent)
7. Brighter Super MySuper(10.4 percent)
8. UniSuper Balanced (10.3 percent)
9. Prime Super MySuper (10.3 percent)
10. Australian Retirement Trust – Super Savings Balanced (10.2 percent).

Chant West said the 9.9 percent delivered by median growth funds erased their 4.6 percent loss in 2022. That was the first year in 11 years that median growth funds recorded a fall in value. Mr Mohankumar said super funds had proven their resilience and robustness, particularly during recent years amid a once-in-a-century pandemic, rapidly rising interest rates and a global economic slowdown.

He pointed out that over the long term, Australian super funds have delivered above-target outcomes. He said the typical long-term objective for growth funds is to beat inflation by 3.5 percent per annum, which translates to just over 6 percent returns. Since the introduction of compulsory super, the annualised return is 7.9 percent and the annual CPI increase is 2.7 percent, giving a real return of 5.2 percent per annum – well above that 3.5percent target,” he said.

Even looking at the past 20 years, which includes three major share market downturns – the GFC in 2007-2009, COVID-19 in 2020 and the high inflation and rising interest rates in 2022 – super funds have returned 7.3 percent per annum, which is still comfortably ahead of the typical objective.”



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Call to cut corporate carbon footprints is loudest from inside organizations, outweighing demand from customers and regulators, survey finds

By YUSUF KHAN
Sun, Mar 3, 2024 2 min

The pressure on companies to cut their carbon footprint is coming more from within the organisations themselves than from customers and regulators, according to a new report.

Three-quarters of business leaders from across the Group of 20 nations said the push to invest in renewable energy is being driven mainly by their own corporate boards, with 77% of U.S. business leaders saying the pressure was extreme or significant, according to a new survey conducted by law firm Ashurst.

The corporate call to decarbonise is intensifying, Ashurst said, with 30% of business leaders saying the pressure from their own boards was extreme, up from 25% in 2022.

“We’re seeing that the energy transition is an area that is firmly embedded in the thinking of investors, corporates, governments and others, so there is a real emphasis on setting and acting on these plans now,” said Michael Burns, global co-head of energy at Ashurst. “That said, the pace of transition and the stage of the journey very much depends from business to business.”

The shift in sentiment comes as companies ramp up investment in renewable spending to meet their net-zero goals. Ashurst found that 71% of the more than 2,000 respondents to its survey had committed to a net-zero target, while 26% of respondents said their targets were under development.

Ashurst also found that solar was the most popular method to decarbonise, with 72% of respondents currently investing in or committed to investing in the clean energy technology. The law firm also found that companies tended to be the most active when it comes to renewable investments, with 52% of the respondents falling into this category. The average turnover of those companies was $15.1 billion.

Meanwhile, 81% of energy-sector respondents to the survey said they see investment in renewables as essential to the organisation’s strategic growth.

Burns said the 2030 timeline to reach net zero was very important to the companies it surveyed. “We are increasingly seeing corporate and other stakeholders actively setting and embracing trajectories to achieve net zero. However, greater clarity and transparency on the standards for measuring and managing these net-zero commitments is needed to ensure consistency in approach and, importantly, outcome,” he said.

Legal battles over climate change and renewable investing are also likely to rise, with 68% of respondents saying they expect to see an increase in legal disputes over the next five years, while only 16% anticipate a decrease, the report said.

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