Australian wages grow at fastest pace since 2009
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,613,207 (-0.60%)       Melbourne $969,484 (-0.54%)       Brisbane $991,125 (-0.15%)       Adelaide $906,278 (+1.12%)       Perth $892,773 (+0.03%)       Hobart $726,294 (-0.04%)       Darwin $657,141 (-1.18%)       Canberra $1,003,818 (-0.83%)       National $1,045,092 (-0.37%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $754,460 (+0.43%)       Melbourne $495,941 (+0.11%)       Brisbane $587,365 (+0.63%)       Adelaide $442,425 (-2.43%)       Perth $461,417 (+0.53%)       Hobart $511,031 (+0.36%)       Darwin $373,250 (+2.98%)       Canberra $492,184 (-1.10%)       National $537,029 (+0.15%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,787 (-116)       Melbourne 14,236 (+55)       Brisbane 8,139 (+64)       Adelaide 2,166 (-18)       Perth 5,782 (+59)       Hobart 1,221 (+5)       Darwin 279 (+4)       Canberra 924 (+36)       National 42,534 (+89)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,638 (-81)       Melbourne 8,327 (-30)       Brisbane 1,728 (-19)       Adelaide 415 (+10)       Perth 1,444 (+2)       Hobart 201 (-10)       Darwin 392 (-7)       Canberra 1,004 (-14)       National 22,149 (-149)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 (+$20)       Melbourne $620 ($0)       Brisbane $630 (-$5)       Adelaide $615 (+$5)       Perth $675 ($0)       Hobart $560 (+$10)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 ($0)       National $670 (+$4)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 ($0)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $630 (+$5)       Adelaide $505 (-$5)       Perth $620 (-$10)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $580 (+$20)       Canberra $550 ($0)       National $597 (-$)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,197 (+313)       Melbourne 6,580 (-5)       Brisbane 4,403 (-85)       Adelaide 1,545 (-44)       Perth 2,951 (+71)       Hobart 398 (-13)       Darwin 97 (+4)       Canberra 643 (+11)       National 22,814 (+252)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,884 (-22)       Melbourne 6,312 (0)       Brisbane 2,285 (-54)       Adelaide 357 (-14)       Perth 783 (-14)       Hobart 129 (-14)       Darwin 132 (+6)       Canberra 831 (+15)       National 21,713 (-97)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.64% (↑)      Melbourne 3.33% (↑)        Brisbane 3.31% (↓)       Adelaide 3.53% (↓)       Perth 3.93% (↓)     Hobart 4.01% (↑)      Darwin 5.54% (↑)      Canberra 3.52% (↑)      National 3.34% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.17% (↓)       Melbourne 6.19% (↓)     Brisbane 5.58% (↑)      Adelaide 5.94% (↑)        Perth 6.99% (↓)       Hobart 4.68% (↓)     Darwin 8.08% (↑)      Canberra 5.81% (↑)        National 5.78% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 29.8 (↓)     Melbourne 31.7 (↑)      Brisbane 30.6 (↑)        Adelaide 25.2 (↓)       Perth 35.2 (↓)     Hobart 35.1 (↑)      Darwin 44.2 (↑)        Canberra 31.5 (↓)     National 32.9 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 29.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.5 (↓)     Brisbane 27.8 (↑)        Adelaide 22.8 (↓)     Perth 38.4 (↑)        Hobart 37.5 (↓)       Darwin 37.3 (↓)       Canberra 40.5 (↓)       National 33.1 (↓)           
Share Button

Australian wages grow at fastest pace since 2009

One significant sector of workers is receiving the highest pay bumps

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, Feb 22, 2024 11:06amGrey Clock 3 min

Wages grew at their fastest pace since 2009 at an annualised 4.2 percent in the December quarter, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). This is the first time that wages have grown faster than inflation since 2021. Newly implemented enterprise agreements for essential workers drove public sector wages growth to its highest quarterly rate in 15 years at 1.3 percent. Private sector wages growth came in at 0.9 percent, mainly due to annual salary reviews at companies.

Michelle Marquardt, ABS head of prices statistics, said: In the December quarter 2023, 38 percent of public sector jobs saw a wage rise, considerably higher than the 29 percent from the same quarter in the previous year. The average hourly wage change for these jobs has lifted to 4.3 percent, higher than 2.8 percent at the same time last year and the highest recorded since September 2008.”

CBA economist Belinda Allen commented that rising unemployment was another factor contributing to higher wages growth in the public sector versus the private sector.

This was the first time since Q1 10 that the public sector was stronger than the private sector in through-the-year growth,” Ms Allen said. Jobs set by individual agreements are generally more tied to demand for labour. The loosening of the labour market seen in recent months is dampening wages growth pressure in individual agreements.

The unemployment rate rose to its highest level in two years at 4.1 percent in January. It is up 0.5 percent in five months, which CBA says is a significant and somewhat concerning pace of change.

The ABS data showed that at an industry-wide level, quarterly wages growth in December was highest in education at 1.7 percent and lowest in accommodation and food at 0.3 percent. Annual wages growth was highest in health care and social assistance at 5.5 percent, which represents the greatest growth since the ABS introduced the Wage Price Index (WPI) data series in 1998. The lowest annual wages growth was in the finance and insurance services industry at 3.2 percent.  

Federal Treasurer Jim Chalmers said workers were earning more under Labor, and from 1 July the amended Stage 3 tax cuts would allow them to keep more of that income.

This is the first time since 2018 we’ve seen three consecutive quarters of real wages growth,” Dr Chalmers said. “Since the election, nominal wages have been growing at an annualised average of 4 percent, compared to 2.2 percent for our predecessors. This is a substantial turnaround in just 18 months.

Ms Allen said CBA expects wages growth to moderate from here to 3.6 percent by year’s end.

Near-term pressure will still occur from enterprise agreements, but a slowing economy, rising labour market spare capacity, and disinflation will gradually weigh on nominal wage increases.”

The ABS data was released on the same day as a report from economic research firm e61 Institute that found restrictions on job mobility, such as the rising use of non-compete clauses in individual contracts, have contributed to a 15-year slowdown in wages growth and productivity. According to e61, switching jobs results in an average 9 percent higher pay rise for workers, but today more than one-fifth of the workforce is restricted by non-compete and no-poach of co-workers agreements.

Such clauses are more common in knowledge industries and “many firms are deploying restraint clauses indiscriminately, potentially adversely affecting low wage workers who lack bargaining power,” said e61. The Federal Government established a Competition Taskforce Advisory Panel in August to investigate ways to increase productivity and wages growth, with non-compete clauses that stop workers from shifting to better-paying jobs one of the first issues to be considered.



MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Money
The Top 10 highest paid CEOs of the ASX 200 revealed
By Bronwyn Allen 23/07/2024
Money
Is ‘Rizz’ the Secret to Getting Ahead at Work?
By RACHEL FEINTZEIG 23/07/2024
Money
Where Do Economists Think We’re Headed? These Are Their Predictions
By SAM GOLDFARB 23/07/2024
The Top 10 highest paid CEOs of the ASX 200 revealed

Along with pay rates, the latest report from the ACSI shows bonuses are no longer based on exceptional results

By Bronwyn Allen
Tue, Jul 23, 2024 2 min

The CEOs of the ASX 200 were paid a little less in FY23 compared to the year before, but bonuses appear to have become the norm rather than a reward for outstanding results, according to the Australia Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI). ACSI has released its 23rd annual report documenting the CEOs’ realised pay, which combines base salaries, bonuses and other incentives.

The highest-paid CEO among Australian-domiciled ASX 200 companies in FY23 was Greg Goodman of Goodman Group, with realised pay of $27.34 million. Goodman Group is the ASX 200’s largest real estate investment trust (REIT) with a global portfolio of $80.5 billion in assets. The highest-paid CEO among foreign-domiciled ASX 200 companies was Mick Farrell of ResMed with realised pay of $47.58 million. ResMed manufactures CPAP machines to treat sleep apnoea.

The realised pay for the CEOs of the largest 100 companies by market capitalisation fell marginally from a median of $3.93 million in FY22 to $3.87 million in FY23. This is the lowest median in the 10 years since ACSI began basing its report on realised pay data. The median realised pay for the CEOs of the next largest 100 companies also fell from $2.1million to $1.95 million.

However, 192 of the ASX 200 CEOs took home a bonus, and Ed John, ACSI’s executive manager of stewardship, is concerned that bonuses are becoming “a given”.

“At a time when companies are focused on productivity and performance, it is critical that bonuses are only paid for exceptional outcomes,” Mr John said. He added that boards should set performance thresholds for CEO bonuses at appropriate levels.

ACSI said the slightly lower median realised pay of ASX 200 CEOs indicated greater scrutiny from shareholders was having an impact. There was a record 41 strike votes against executive pay at ASX 300 annual general meetings (AGMs) in 2023. This indicated an increasing number of shareholders were feeling unhappy with the executive pay levels at the companies in which they were invested.

A strike vote means 25 percent or more of shareholders voted against a company’s remuneration report. If a second strike vote is recorded at the next AGM, shareholders can vote to force the directors to stand for re-election.

10 highest-paid ASX 200 CEOs in FY23

1. Mick Farrell, ResMed, $47.58 million*
2. Robert Thomson, News Corporation, $41.53 million*
3. Greg Goodman, Goodman Group, $27.34 million
4. Shemara Wikramanayake, Macquarie Group, $25.32 million
5. Mike Henry, BHP Group, $19.68 million
6. Matt Comyn, Commonwealth Bank, $10.52 million
7. Jakob Stausholm, Rio Tinto, $10.47 million
8. Rob Scott, Wesfarmers, $9.57 million
9. Ron Delia, Amcor, $9.33 million*
10. Colin Goldschmidt, Sonic Healthcare, $8.35 million

Source: ACSI. Foreign-domiciled ASX 200 companies*

MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Money
Superannuation funds deliver 9.1 percent return for FY24
By Bronwyn Allen 19/07/2024
Money
Taking on Fast Fashion With Leather Bags Made From Luxury Brand Scraps
By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore 29/06/2024
Property
What does 2025 hold for housing values in your city? The experts weigh in
By Bronwyn Allen 09/07/2024
0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop