Forget the Pool or Even the Living Room—‘Our Closet Time Is Precious’
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,655,505 (-0.06%)       Melbourne $994,898 (+0.02%)       Brisbane $991,841 (+1.33%)       Adelaide $889,373 (+1.26%)       Perth $861,566 (+0.49%)       Hobart $729,893 (-1.65%)       Darwin $669,344 (+0.35%)       Canberra $999,769 (+1.27%)       National $1,055,910 (+0.34%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $749,436 (-0.10%)       Melbourne $494,327 (+0.46%)       Brisbane $554,094 (+2.77%)       Adelaide $439,361 (-1.14%)       Perth $456,655 (-0.27%)       Hobart $524,871 (-0.43%)       Darwin $349,455 (+1.52%)       Canberra $494,554 (-1.96%)       National $530,871 (+0.07%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,048 (-72)       Melbourne 14,823 (-272)       Brisbane 7,999 (+9)       Adelaide 2,372 (-66)       Perth 6,238 (-89)       Hobart 1,265 (-29)       Darwin 232 (-6)       Canberra 1,020 (0)       National 43,997 (-525)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,719 (-61)       Melbourne 8,033 (-189)       Brisbane 1,615 (-4)       Adelaide 391 (-5)       Perth 1,570 (-29)       Hobart 203 (-10)       Darwin 394 (-6)       Canberra 1,010 (+7)       National 21,935 (-297)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 ($0)       Melbourne $600 (-$10)       Brisbane $640 ($0)       Adelaide $610 ($0)       Perth $670 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 ($0)       National $668 (-$1)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 (-$25)       Melbourne $550 ($0)       Brisbane $630 ($0)       Adelaide $500 ($0)       Perth $640 (+$13)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $513 (+$13)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $589 (-$2)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,497 (+71)       Melbourne 5,818 (+35)       Brisbane 4,141 (+99)       Adelaide 1,399 (0)       Perth 2,377 (+32)       Hobart 400 (+17)       Darwin 111 (+17)       Canberra 604 (+9)       National 20,347 (+280)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,083 (+248)       Melbourne 4,637 (+100)       Brisbane 2,182 (-27)       Adelaide 393 (+2)       Perth 731 (-10)       Hobart 130 (-7)       Darwin 144 (-8)       Canberra 684 (+72)       National 17,984 (+370)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.58% (↑)        Melbourne 3.14% (↓)       Brisbane 3.36% (↓)       Adelaide 3.57% (↓)       Perth 4.04% (↓)     Hobart 3.92% (↑)        Darwin 5.44% (↓)       Canberra 3.54% (↓)       National 3.29% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.20% (↓)       Melbourne 5.79% (↓)       Brisbane 5.91% (↓)     Adelaide 5.92% (↑)      Perth 7.29% (↑)      Hobart 4.46% (↑)      Darwin 7.63% (↑)      Canberra 5.99% (↑)        National 5.77% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 30.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.5 (↑)      Brisbane 31.7 (↑)        Adelaide 25.7 (↓)     Perth 35.4 (↑)      Hobart 33.7 (↑)        Darwin 36.2 (↓)     Canberra 32.0 (↑)        National 32.1 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 31.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.9 (↑)      Brisbane 32.1 (↑)        Adelaide 24.8 (↓)       Perth 38.7 (↓)     Hobart 37.6 (↑)        Darwin 46.5 (↓)     Canberra 39.2 (↑)        National 35.3 (↓)           
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Forget the Pool or Even the Living Room—‘Our Closet Time Is Precious’

Some homeowners are taking the coziness and intimacy of the primary suite’s walk-in wardrobe to the next level and transforming it from functional storage into the home’s centrepiece

By SHIVANI VORA
Mon, Apr 15, 2024 8:58amGrey Clock 4 min

A room you might not expect comes to mind when home seller Karen Haines reflects on fond memories at her Hollywood Regency-style house in Palm Springs, California: her bedroom closet.

“Forget the great room, swimming pool or hot tub. All the action in the house happens in the closet. It’s where everyone wants to be,” said Haines of the enormous space, which is decked out with white tones, mirrors, marble and gold finishes, and has double sinks with bird-shaped faucets.

Haines and her husband, Chris, are selling the house, designed by acclaimed architect Robert Marx and on the market with Douglas Elliman for $5.2 million. The couple, both entrepreneurs in the music industry, usually keep classic rock ‘n’ roll playing in the closet all day, she said.

“My daughter and I try on clothes in there, and Chris and I drink coffee in the morning and cocktails come evening,” she said.

For most homeowners, closets are merely functional—that is, a place to hold clothes, accessories and other items that they turn to for everyday wear. Some, however, are taking the coziness and intimacy of the primary suite’s walk-in closet to the next level and turning it into the home’s prized space. It’s become a place where couples can connect at the end of a hectic day or a lounge where owners socialise with friends, enjoy a morning coffee, and, yes, even imbibe with cocktails and wine.

Chris Lim, a real estate agent and former president of Christie’s International Real Estate, said that he is witnessing a redefining of the concept of walk-in closets.

“With the inclusion of features like bar sinks, lounge seating, spacious islands and glass displays and expanded vanity areas, walk-in closets now offer a retreat for morning rituals and post-day relaxation,” he said. “They’ve become hubs of activity and connection in multimillion-dollar homes.”

Oscar Flink

Part of the trend, he said, is the growing number of fashion and social media influencers, who often use their bedroom closets as their offices or filming space.

When it comes to showpiece closets, Brazilian design firm Ornare is a leading name and charges between $30,000 and close to $1 million for its services.

Claudio Faria, the CEO of Ornare Miami, said that when he opened his business in 2007, closets were an afterthought with homeowners investing their money in zhuzhing up public-facing spaces such as kitchens and family rooms. Now, he said, closets are dominating home design—his business has grown 50% annually for the last five years as a result.

“Closets have become more important because, in the way that wealthy people collect cars and art, they’re collecting clothes, and closets are the venues to show them off,” Faria said. They’re also a unique area to use in your home because of their intimacy and become talking points.”

Ana Paula Siebert Justus is a client and tapped Ornare to bring her vision of a glamorous closet to life. Justus, a fashion influencer, and her husband, Roberto Justus, an entrepreneur, own a five-bedroom condominium in Sunny Isles, Florida. The large wardrobe in their bedroom is awash in green hues, wood and leather. Backlighting features throughout, and there are sections for handbags and clothes plus a hat rack and a vanity with a chair.

“I spend a lot of time in my closet shooting content, so it needs to be in photograph-ready shape,” she said. “It has no door, and one of my favorite ways to connect with Roberto is to catch up as I’m getting dressed for the day or evening events. Our closet time is precious.”

Tina Trahan, a philanthropist and art collector, lives in Los Angeles’s Studio City neighbourhood in a 5,100-square-foot home that was the exterior for the home on “The Brady Bunch” TV series. She shared similar sentiments about her closet. She has repurposed one of the bedrooms into the space and has outfitted it with double-height rolling racks, a three-way mirror, a sofa, a Miele coffee machine and a fridge stocked with drinks including White Claws—her beverage of choice.

Windermere Real Estate

Trahan said that she frequently entertains girlfriends, and they love heading to her closet to drink tequila and wine and catch up.

“We end up ordering sushi and eating it there. My closet is 100% our favourite place to hang out,” she said.

Other examples of these double-duty flashy closets abound.

Real estate agent Katrina Barrett of Christie’s International Real Estate Walt Danley | Local Luxury is overseeing the marketing and sale of a $40 million home in Paradise Valley, Arizona. The centrepiece of its primary suite is an expansive closet with seating, a steaming area, hidden panels to store valuables and a secret door leading to a sports barn with a pickleball court and golf simulator.

In another example, Susan Archer is selling her home in Issaquah, Washington, near Seattle, for more than $6 million through Windermere Real Estate/Luxury Portfolio International. She described the property’s primary bedroom’s closet as “a haven for creating memorable moments with friends and family.”

The white-painted space has marble and cream walls and features backlighting, a display case that’s common in upscale boutiques, a washer and dryer, a wet bar, an island and seating.

“Many of my girlfriends and I have gathered around the island, their excitement palpable as they admire my collection. With champagne flutes in hand, the atmosphere is lively and carefree,” Archer said. “Beyond the soirées with friends, my closet holds a special place for precious moments with my daughter. As she grows, her interest in fashion blossoms, and my closet becomes a treasure trove of inspiration for her budding style.”



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The sticky economic factor making an interest rate drop unlikely this year

It’s a key indicator in the RBA board’s decision making process, but it is proving difficult to move in the right direction

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The consumer price index (CPI) rose in April to an annual rate of 3.6 percent, which was 0.1 percent higher than in March, raising doubts about an interest rate cut this year as inflation starts looking stickier than expected. This is the second consecutive month of small rises, potentially indicating that Australia is experiencing the same stalled progress in bringing inflation down that is being seen in the United States, as both nations approach their central banks’ target inflation bands.

In Australia, the target inflation band is 2 to 3 percent, with the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) aiming to achieve the midpoint under its new agreement with the Federal Government following a formal review. In its interest rate decision-making, the RBA does not give as much weight to the monthly inflation data because not all prices are measured like they are in the quarterly data. On a quarterly basis, inflation has continued to fall. In the March quarter, the annual rate of inflation was 3.6 percent, down from 4.1 percent in December, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

CBA economist Stephen Wu noted the April data was above the bank’s forecast of 3.5 percent as well as the industrywide consensus forecast of 3.4 percent. He predicts the next leg down in inflation won’t be until the September quarter, when we will see the effects of electricity rebates and a likely smaller minimum wage increase to be announced by the Fair Work Commission next month compared to June 2023.

The most significant contributor to the April inflation rise were housing costs, which rose 4.9 percent on an annual basis. This reflects a continuing rise in weekly rents amid near-record low vacancy rates across the country, as well as significantly higher labour and materials costs which builders are passing on to the buyers of new homes, as well as renovators.

The second biggest contributor was food and non-alcoholic beverages, up 3.8 percent annually, reflecting higher prices for fruit and vegetables in April. The ABS said unfavourable weather led to a reduced supply of berries, bananas and vegetables such as broccoli. The annual rate of inflation for alcohol and tobacco rose by 6.5 percent, and transport rose by 4.2 percent due to higher fuel prices.

Robert Carnell, the Asia Pacific head of research at ING, said they no longer expect a rate cut this year after seeing the April data. Mr Carnell said an increase in trend inflation was apparent and “rate cuts this year look unlikely”. In the RBA’s latest monetary policy statement, published before the April CPI was released, it said: “Inflation is expected to be higher in the near term than previously thought due to the stronger labour market and higher petrol prices. But inflation is still expected to return to the target range in the second half of 2025 and to reach the midpoint in 2026.”

 

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Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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