Metals Markets Steel For Price Rises As Australia Pushes To Save Cultural Sites
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
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Metals Markets Steel For Price Rises As Australia Pushes To Save Cultural Sites

Delays to mining projects in Western Australia could push commodity prices higher and exacerbate shortages.

By RHIANNON HOYLE
Wed, Dec 16, 2020 3:42amGrey Clock 3 min

SYDNEY—Rio Tinto PLC’s destruction of two ancient caves in Australia to expand an iron-ore mine could have ramifications for global commodity markets if local lawmakers intensify scrutiny of mining activities that threaten heritage sites.

Among the most controversial recommendations made by a federal-government inquiry into the destruction of the rock shelters at Juukan Gorge in Western Australia in May is a moratorium on expansions of existing mines or new pits that encroach on sites of cultural or historical significance. Even if lawmakers opt for a less hard-line approach, experts warn of potential delays to production and higher costs that could affect supply of key raw materials such as iron ore, used to make steel.

None of the recommendations handed down by the inquiry in its interim report on Wednesday are binding, but miners risk inflaming tensions with some investors who feel the industry needs to show greater sensitivity to environmental and cultural issues if they don’t accept them. They also face sensitive negotiations with indigenous groups that are the traditional owners of the land.

Metals prices have been rallying as China’s economy bounces back strongly and other major markets recover from the coronavirus crisis. Copper prices have risen to their highest level in almost eight years. Iron ore is one of the best-performing assets this year, fetching $150.75 a metric ton on Wednesday, its highest price since early 2013.

China’s unexpectedly strong appetite for these commodities has raised concerns over whether there’s enough supply, with many analysts predicting market deficits for iron ore and copper through at least the middle of next year.

Delays to mining projects in Western Australia, where companies dig up metals including copper and gold, could push commodity prices higher and exacerbate shortages already worsened by pandemic-driven disruptions to operations elsewhere. Iron ore is considered to be most at risk because Australia accounts for more than half of the world’s trade in the commodity by sea.

“This could be a watershed moment for the Western Australia mining industry and could impact Western Australia iron-ore production, and possibly other commodities, in 2021 and beyond,” Goldman Sachs said.

Already there are tensions between miners and some investors following the report into the loss of the Juukan caves, which contained a trove of artifacts that indicated they had been occupied by humans more than 46,000 years ago.

Fortescue Metals Ltd., the world’s fourth-largest iron-ore exporter by volume, rejected the idea of a voluntary moratorium on new heritage consents. “We do not believe that this is either a feasible or practical solution,” Elizabeth Gaines, Fortescue’s chief executive, said.

Fortescue said it had worked with indigenous groups to protect and avoid nearly 6,000 heritage sites threatened by its mining activities.

Miners must balance the need to replace the ore that they unearth with respecting the interests of indigenous groups. Fortescue pointed out that the iron-ore industry has been a pillar of Australia’s economy as it emerges from a first recession in 29 years.

“A moratorium would unnecessarily stall mining, infrastructure and other activities for an unknown and possibly extended period,” said Tania Constable, chief executive of Minerals Council of Australia, an industry group.

Still, many investors feel the industry needs to do more, and have pushed for leadership changes when standards fall short. Rio Tinto Chief Executive Jean-Sébastien Jacques and two other executives were ousted after several investors criticized the company’s initial response to the caves’ destruction because no one had been held accountable.

Hesta, an Australian pension fund for health-care workers, said it strongly supports the recommendation that companies with existing heritage approvals, known as Section 18 permissions, suspend related works until they can verify consent by traditional landowners.

“The inescapable findings of the inquiry are that Aboriginal heritage sites remain vulnerable to destruction,” said Debby Blakey, Hesta’s chief executive. “It would be unacceptable to investors that boards of mining companies are not actively and transparently seeking to understand their exposure to this risk.”

Kim Christie, an iron-ore analyst at Wood Mackenzie, said a near-term squeeze on commodities supply from Australia isn’t likely. The final report from the inquiry won’t be finalized until next year. Still, there is a risk of higher mining costs and delays to expansions or new mines later as miners sharpen their focus on heritage issues and consultation with traditional owners, she said.

“Certainly moving forward if there is going to be that greater level of tightness [in supply] it could support prices higher than we otherwise would have thought,” Ms Christie said.

Scrutiny will especially fall on Rio Tinto. A moratorium on new heritage consents could affect up to 12 projects that Rio Tinto has planned over the next five or so years to maintain its iron-ore production at current rates, Goldman Sachs said. That means there is a risk that Rio Tinto won’t ship 327 million tons of iron ore next year as the bank had earlier forecast.

Rio Tinto said it is reassessing its mining operations in places with identified heritage sites that could be affected over the coming two years.

“I think Rio Tinto would rather forgo a few tons than their reputation,” said Ms Christie, of Wood Mackenzie.



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The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way

The younger generation will bring a different mindset to how and where their newfound wealth is invested

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, Mar 1, 2024 2 min

There is an enormous global wealth transfer in its beginning stages, whereby one of the largest generations in history – the baby boomers – will pass on their wealth to their millennial children. Knight Frank’s global research report, The Wealth Report 2024, estimates the wealth transfer set to take place over the next two decades in the United States alone will amount to US$90 trillion.

But it’s not just the size of the wealth transfer that is significant. It will also deliver billions of dollars in private capital into the hands of investors with a very different mindset.

Seismic change

Wealth managers say the young and rich have a higher social and environmental consciousness than older generations. After growing up in a world where economic inequality is rife and climate change has caused massive environmental damage, they are seeing their inherited wealth as a means of doing good.

Ben Whattam, co-founder of the Modern Affluence Exchange, describes it as a “seismic change”.

“Since World War II, Western economies have been driven by an overt focus on economic prosperity,” he says. “This has come at the expense of environmental prosperity and has arguably imposed social costs. The next generation is poised to inherit huge sums, and all the research we have commissioned confirms that they value societal and environmental wellbeing alongside economic gain and are unlikely to continue the relentless pursuit of growth at all costs.”

Investing with purpose

Mr Whattam said 66% of millennials wanted to invest with a purpose compared to 49% of Gen Xers. “Climate change is the number one concern for Gen Z and whether they’re rich or just affluent, they see it as their generational responsibility to fix what has been broken by their elders.”

Mike Pickett, director of Cazenove Capital, said millennial investors were less inclined to let a wealth manager make all the decisions.

“Overall, … there is a sense of the next generation wanting to be involved and engaged in the process of how their wealth is managed – for a firm to invest their money with them instead of for them,” he said.

Mr Pickett said another significant difference between millennials and older clients was their view on residential property investment. While property has generated immense wealth for baby boomers, particularly in Australia, younger investors did not necessarily see it as the best path.

“In particular, the low interest rate environment and impressive growth in house prices of the past 15 years is unlikely to be repeated in the next 15,” he said. “I also think there is some evidence that Gen Z may be happier to rent property or lease assets such as cars, and to adopt subscription-led lifestyles.”

Impact investing is a rising trend around the world, with more young entrepreneurs and activist investors proactively campaigning for change in the older companies they are invested in. Millennials are taking note of Gen X examples of entrepreneurs trying to force change. In 2022,  Australian billionaire tech mogul and major AGL shareholder, Mike Cannon-Brookes tried to buy the company so he could shut down its coal operations and turn it into a renewable energy giant. He described his takeover bid as “the world’s biggest decarbonisation project”.

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