Michael Saylor Bet Billions on Bitcoin and Lost
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
Share Button

Michael Saylor Bet Billions on Bitcoin and Lost

The longtime MicroStrategy CEO, and perhaps the biggest bitcoin bull, steps down.

By Paul Vigna
Thu, Aug 4, 2022 4:29pmGrey Clock 3 min

If you ask Michael Saylor why he bet the future of his company on bitcoin, he’ll tell you he didn’t have a choice.

In 2020, MicroStrategy Inc.’s stock was stagnant, and the tech company struggled to compete with software giants. “We were either going to die a fast death, or a slow death, or embark on a risky strategy,” he said.

He opted to buy bitcoin—lots of it. That decision backfired, badly. On Tuesday, MicroStrategy announced Mr. Saylor would step down as CEO, a position he has held since 1989, amid mounting losses tied to bitcoin.

His dalliance with bitcoin began on Aug. 11, 2020 when the company announced a plan to take $500 million—half of its corporate reserve—and convert it into bitcoin. It has since doubled down, and doubled down again.

In total, MicroStrategy raised $3.45 billion in debt and loans. It issued $1.44 billion in equity. The company used it all to buy bitcoin.

For a time, the decision appeared to be working. The price of bitcoin rose from about $17,088 in August 2020 to nearly $99,000 by November 2021. MicroStrategy’s stock rose from US$124 the day before its announcement to a record of US$1,273 on Feb. 9, 2021.

But on Tuesday, MicroStrategy announced its seventh quarterly loss in the eight quarters since it started buying bitcoin. This time the loss was big: $1.44 billion, much of that from bitcoin.

The same day, the company announced Phong Le, the company’s president, will take on the additional role of CEO. Mr. Saylor took on the role of executive chairman.

MicroStrategy shares were down 49% year-to-date through Tuesday, and 78% from its record.

The company is sitting on nearly 130,000 bitcoins valued at roughly $4.3 billion at current market prices. Its market capitalisation is about $4.45 billion. Essentially, MicroStrategy has become a bitcoin-holding vehicle with a cash-generating software business attached to it.

MicroStrategy’s losses reflect the volatility of bitcoin. Under accounting rules, the company must assess the value of its bitcoin holdings each quarter and take an impairment charge if the price has declined. MicroStrategy has taken a string of such charges totalling about $3.5 billion.

The bitcoin strategy turned Mr. Saylor into one of bitcoin’s most visible proponents. His Twitter feed, followed by 2.6 million, is a constant stream of pro-bitcoin quips.

He is uniformly bullish in interviews. In one, he advised people to “take all your money and buy bitcoin. Then take all your time, figure out how to borrow more money to buy more bitcoin. Then take all your time to figure out what you can sell to buy bitcoin.”

He similarly advised a conference room full of crypto enthusiasts in Miami to never sell their bitcoin.

It is this very philosophy that has worried some market observers.

“MicroStrategy is not an ideal investment for most traders,” said Oanda analyst Edward Moya.

For one thing, Mr. Moya said, MicroStrategy’s strategy was only to buy and hold bitcoin. There was no profit-taking. There also was no hedging against the inevitable volatility and tumbles. When the selloffs came, MicroStrategy was exposed to the full breadth of them.

Another problem is that the company doesn’t have many more ways to get more money to buy more bitcoin, said BTIG analyst Mark Palmer. “A lot of the levers MicroStrategy could have pulled to create more capacity have been pulled,” he said. “Now it’s just using the cash flow from the software business.”

Still, Mr. Palmer said, the ultimate judgment on MicroStrategy’s bitcoin bet won’t come until some of that debt it borrowed to buy bitcoin starts to mature. If the price of bitcoin languishes, the company is going to have problems paying back its creditors, he said.

“The ticking clock is the maturity of the MicroStrategy debt,” he said.

Despite the risks and the criticisms, Mr. Saylor still believes in his strategy, and bitcoin. In an interview last week, he noted that the stock is still well above its pre-bitcoin levels, and believes the strategy has raised the company’s profile, despite the risks attached to it.

“I feel better about it today than I did on the day we started,” he said.

He says he will continue to head MicroStrategy’s bitcoin investments. He has no plans to sell any bitcoin, and still expects it to gain in value over the years. The company reiterated Tuesday it has no plans to sell any bitcoin.

Mr. Saylor said swapping the CEO roles had been a long-term plan. “The new executive structure means I can even more enthusiastically focus on communications and strategy and bitcoin advocacy and evangelism,” he said.



MOST POPULAR

Consumers are going to gravitate toward applications powered by the buzzy new technology, analyst Michael Wolf predicts

Chris Dixon, a partner who led the charge, says he has a ‘very long-term horizon’

Related Stories
Money
The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way
By Bronwyn Allen 01/03/2024
Money
Japan Is Back. Is Inflation the Reason?
By GREG IP 01/03/2024
Money
Welcome to the Era of BadGPTs
By BELLE LIN 29/02/2024
The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way

The younger generation will bring a different mindset to how and where their newfound wealth is invested

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, Mar 1, 2024 2 min

There is an enormous global wealth transfer in its beginning stages, whereby one of the largest generations in history – the baby boomers – will pass on their wealth to their millennial children. Knight Frank’s global research report, The Wealth Report 2024, estimates the wealth transfer set to take place over the next two decades in the United States alone will amount to US$90 trillion.

But it’s not just the size of the wealth transfer that is significant. It will also deliver billions of dollars in private capital into the hands of investors with a very different mindset.

Seismic change

Wealth managers say the young and rich have a higher social and environmental consciousness than older generations. After growing up in a world where economic inequality is rife and climate change has caused massive environmental damage, they are seeing their inherited wealth as a means of doing good.

Ben Whattam, co-founder of the Modern Affluence Exchange, describes it as a “seismic change”.

“Since World War II, Western economies have been driven by an overt focus on economic prosperity,” he says. “This has come at the expense of environmental prosperity and has arguably imposed social costs. The next generation is poised to inherit huge sums, and all the research we have commissioned confirms that they value societal and environmental wellbeing alongside economic gain and are unlikely to continue the relentless pursuit of growth at all costs.”

Investing with purpose

Mr Whattam said 66% of millennials wanted to invest with a purpose compared to 49% of Gen Xers. “Climate change is the number one concern for Gen Z and whether they’re rich or just affluent, they see it as their generational responsibility to fix what has been broken by their elders.”

Mike Pickett, director of Cazenove Capital, said millennial investors were less inclined to let a wealth manager make all the decisions.

“Overall, … there is a sense of the next generation wanting to be involved and engaged in the process of how their wealth is managed – for a firm to invest their money with them instead of for them,” he said.

Mr Pickett said another significant difference between millennials and older clients was their view on residential property investment. While property has generated immense wealth for baby boomers, particularly in Australia, younger investors did not necessarily see it as the best path.

“In particular, the low interest rate environment and impressive growth in house prices of the past 15 years is unlikely to be repeated in the next 15,” he said. “I also think there is some evidence that Gen Z may be happier to rent property or lease assets such as cars, and to adopt subscription-led lifestyles.”

Impact investing is a rising trend around the world, with more young entrepreneurs and activist investors proactively campaigning for change in the older companies they are invested in. Millennials are taking note of Gen X examples of entrepreneurs trying to force change. In 2022,  Australian billionaire tech mogul and major AGL shareholder, Mike Cannon-Brookes tried to buy the company so he could shut down its coal operations and turn it into a renewable energy giant. He described his takeover bid as “the world’s biggest decarbonisation project”.

MOST POPULAR

Consumers are going to gravitate toward applications powered by the buzzy new technology, analyst Michael Wolf predicts

Chris Dixon, a partner who led the charge, says he has a ‘very long-term horizon’

Related Stories
Property
Desperate Chinese Property Developers Resort to Bizarre Marketing Tactics
By REBECCA FENG 24/01/2024
Property
Top Suburbs For House Price Growth In 2023
By Bronwyn Allen 27/12/2023
Money
Picasso, Monet, Warhol, Basquiat, and Richter Lead Artists Powering the US$1 Million-Plus Market
By ABBY SCHULTZ 24/12/2023
0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop