The Primary Breadwinner Is Disappearing From More Homes
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,656,430 (+0.65%)       Melbourne $994,677 (+0.27%)       Brisbane $978,777 (+0.15%)       Adelaide $878,311 (-0.89%)       Perth $857,374 (-0.27%)       Hobart $742,122 (-0.64%)       Darwin $666,990 (-0.54%)       Canberra $987,062 (-0.84%)       National $1,052,287 (+0.12%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750,216 (+0.60%)       Melbourne $492,069 (-0.93%)       Brisbane $539,184 (+0.19%)       Adelaide $444,416 (-2.21%)       Perth $457,888 (+0.17%)       Hobart $527,154 (-0.12%)       Darwin $344,216 (+0.22%)       Canberra $504,424 (-0.33%)       National $530,515 (-0.07%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,120 (-121)       Melbourne 15,095 (-40)       Brisbane 7,990 (0)       Adelaide 2,438 (+11)       Perth 6,327 (-40)       Hobart 1,294 (-21)       Darwin 238 (+1)       Canberra 1,020 (+13)       National 44,522 (-197)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,780 (+4)       Melbourne 8,222 (-18)       Brisbane 1,619 (+1)       Adelaide 396 (-4)       Perth 1,599 (+9)       Hobart 213 (+10)       Darwin 400 (-6)       Canberra 1,003 (-24)       National 22,232 (-28)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 (+$20)       Melbourne $610 (+$10)       Brisbane $640 (+$3)       Adelaide $610 (+$10)       Perth $670 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 (-$10)       National $669 (+$5)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $775 (+$15)       Melbourne $550 ($0)       Brisbane $630 (-$20)       Adelaide $500 (+$5)       Perth $628 (+$8)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $500 (-$15)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $591 (+$)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,426 (-22)       Melbourne 5,783 (+92)       Brisbane 4,042 (+149)       Adelaide 1,399 (+12)       Perth 2,345 (+25)       Hobart 383 (-2)       Darwin 94 (-10)       Canberra 595 (-9)       National 20,067 (+235)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,835 (+301)       Melbourne 4,537 (+107)       Brisbane 2,209 (+57)       Adelaide 391 (-8)       Perth 741 (-7)       Hobart 137 (+5)       Darwin 152 (-14)       Canberra 612 (+17)       National 17,614 (+458)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.57% (↑)      Melbourne 3.19% (↑)      Brisbane 3.40% (↑)      Adelaide 3.61% (↑)      Perth 4.06% (↑)      Hobart 3.85% (↑)      Darwin 5.46% (↑)        Canberra 3.58% (↓)     National 3.30% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.37% (↑)      Melbourne 5.81% (↑)        Brisbane 6.08% (↓)     Adelaide 5.85% (↑)      Perth 7.13% (↑)      Hobart 4.44% (↑)        Darwin 7.55% (↓)     Canberra 5.88% (↑)      National 5.80% (↑)             HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 30.3 (↓)       Melbourne 31.5 (↓)       Brisbane 31.7 (↓)       Adelaide 25.7 (↓)       Perth 35.4 (↓)     Hobart 33.7 (↑)      Darwin 36.2 (↑)        Canberra 32.0 (↓)     National 32.1 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 31.3 (↓)       Melbourne 31.9 (↓)       Brisbane 32.1 (↓)       Adelaide 24.8 (↓)       Perth 38.7 (↓)       Hobart 37.6 (↓)     Darwin 46.5 (↑)        Canberra 39.2 (↓)     National 35.3 (↑)            
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The Primary Breadwinner Is Disappearing From More Homes

The economics of marriage are changing, but women still take on more of the unpaid labour

By JULIA CARPENTER
Fri, Apr 14, 2023 8:30amGrey Clock 4 min

Nearly a third of marriages today have no primary breadwinner, as women continue to make strides toward greater equality at work and home.

About 30% of U.S. opposite-sex marriages are egalitarian in earnings, according to new data from Pew Research Center, meaning each spouse earns somewhere between 40% and 60% of the couples’ joint earnings. One of the main drivers of the shift is younger women making more money, said Pew.

The share of women earning more than their husbands has more than tripled from 5% to 16% over the last 50 years. In 1972, 49% of husbands were the sole breadwinner, meaning the husband had positive earnings and the wife had no earnings. By 2022, that share had dropped to 23% of opposite-sex marriages.

But the larger financial contributions by women don’t mean that relationships are more equal or women are better off in every realm of life, said Richard Fry, senior researcher at Pew Research Center.

Even when women earn as much as their husbands, they still put in around two more hours a week on caregiving than their husbands do, plus another 2.5 hours more on housework, according to Pew. In those same relationships, men spend nearly 3.5 more hours on leisure activities, such as watching television or playing video games, than their wives do.

Women’s economic role in marriages continues to rise despite a persistent gender pay gap and declining labor-force participation, Mr. Fry said. “In spite of some trends that would suggest to me that women’s economic role would not be growing, what we found was ‘No, it still is,’” he said.

Financial advisers and researchers say the changing money dynamic can cause marital strife, or in some cases, divorce.

Changes in breadwinner status “can lead to a lot of frustrations and arguments and resentment,” said Stacy Francis, president and chief executive of wealth-management firm Francis Financial and founder of a financial-education nonprofit.

When Ms. Francis, who often works with breadwinning women, surpassed her husband in earnings, she said the pair celebrated. After years of bearing the burden of bringing home most of the bacon, her husband was somewhat relieved to turn the job over to her, she said.

But Ms. Francis, now 48, soon found herself spending more time in the kitchen, throwing herself into the local parent-teacher association and planning her son’s prom—all, she said, in an effort to somehow compensate for other work and time spent away.

“It made me feel less feminine to earn more than my husband,” she said. “I realised, looking back, that I myself had to get comfortable with that role.”

Men remain the breadwinner in most marriages, meaning they earn more than 60% of the total earnings, Pew found.

The marriages with the highest total income are those in which both spouses are bringing in money. Marriages in which women are the primary breadwinners earn more than those in which men hold the same role: $145,000 in median income compared with $121,000 for marriages overall, according to the Pew data. A primary breadwinner in Pew’s research occurs when one spouse earns more than 60% of the household earnings.

Sole-breadwinner couples, or marriages in which one spouse has earnings and the other has none, make significantly less, with median incomes of around $75,000. Such couples also are more likely to be below the poverty line.

When women are the sole breadwinners, men spend more time on caregiving and a more equal amount of housework, compared with egalitarian marriages. But women still spend roughly the same amount of time on caregiving and household work, regardless of whether they are in egalitarian marriages or are sole or primary breadwinners, Pew found. Women without children are more likely to be the primary breadwinner than those with children.

Spouses within same-sex couples, however, tend to split the domestic labor more equally than their heterosexual counterparts, research shows.

Some researchers say one reason for the housework divide is that most of these gender roles have been built up over generations. There is a fear from some women that stopping this work could risk their marriage.

“We still see that there are remnants and large cultural issues associated with the sensitivity of women’s economic success, as a thing that destroys relationships,” said Johanna Rickne, professor of economics at the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University.

Both husbands and wives can work to address these imbalances, said Jennifer Clark, a 34-year-old digital marketer based outside Chicago.

While her husband, a director of an audio-production company, has earned more than Ms. Clark for much of their 10-year marriage, she sets the monthly budget and manages household finances.

“It doesn’t feel like he has a larger share of the finances even though he is earning that money,” she said.

Throughout their marriage, Ms. Clark worked in freelance and part-time roles while her husband had full-time jobs. During those periods, she said, she bore a greater share of the household and caregiving responsibilities for their two children. But talking about their finances and making decisions together helped them remain equal partners.

“I would say I’ve always had a pretty good sense of financial autonomy, even with money I didn’t necessarily earn, because we make those decisions collaboratively,” she said.



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Global economic growth is becoming more broad based, with surveys indicating that business activity in both the U.S. and the eurozone gained momentum in May.

The eurozone economy contracted in the second half of 2023 following a surge in energy and food prices triggered by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and the subsequent rise in interest rates intended to tame that inflation.

By contrast, the U.S. economy expanded strongly over the same period, opening up an unusually wide growth gap with the eurozone. That gap narrowed as the eurozone returned to growth in the first three months of the year, while the U.S. slowed.

However, surveys released Thursday point to a fresh acceleration in the U.S., even as growth in the eurozone strengthened. That bodes well for a global economy that relied heavily on the U.S. for its dynamism in 2023.

The S&P Global Flash U.S. Composite PMI —which gauges activity in the manufacturing and services sectors—rose to 54.4 in May from 51.3 in April, marking a 25-month high and the first time since the beginning of the year that the index hasn’t slowed. A level over 50 indicates expansion in private-sector activity.

“The data put the U.S. economy back on course for another solid gross domestic product gain in the second quarter,” said Chris Williamson, chief business economist at S&P Global Market Intelligence.

Eurozone business activity in turn increased for the third straight month in May, and at the fastest pace in a year, the surveys suggest. The currency area’s joint composite PMI rose to 52.3 from 51.7.

The uptick was led by powerhouse economy Germany, where continued strength in services and improvement in industry drove activity to its highest level in a year. That helped the manufacturing sector in the bloc as a whole grow closer to recovery, reaching a 15-month peak.

By contrast, surveys of purchasing managers pointed to a slowdown in the U.K. economy following a stronger-than-expected start to the year that saw it outpace the U.S. The survey was released a day after Prime Minister Rishi Sunak called a surprise election for early July, banking on signs of an improved economic outlook to turn around a large deficit in the opinion polls.

Similar surveys pointed to a further acceleration in India’s rapidly-expanding economy, and to a rebound in Japan, where the economy contracted in the first three months of the year. In Australia, the surveys pointed to a slight slowdown in growth during May.

Businesses reported that they were raising their prices at the slowest pace since November, which should reassure the European Central Bank. However, the eurozone continued to add jobs in May, suggesting that wages might not cool as rapidly as the ECB had hoped.

The ECB released figures Thursday that showed wages negotiated by labor unions in the eurozone were 4.7% higher in the first quarter than a year earlier, a faster increase than the 4.5% recorded in the final three months of 2023

The ECB has signalled it will lower its key interest rate in early June, while the Fed is waiting for evidence that a slowdown in inflation will resume after setbacks this year.

Nevertheless, eurozone businesses and households shouldn’t bank on successive cuts to borrowing costs, ECB Vice President Luis de Guindos said. “There is a huge degree of uncertainty,” he said. “We have made no decisions on the number of interest rate cuts or on their size,” he said in an interview published Thursday. “We will see how economic data evolve.”

Continued resilience in the eurozone economy would likely make the ECB more cautious about lowering borrowing costs after its first move, economist Franziska Palmas at Capital Economics wrote in a note. “If the economy continues to hold up well, cuts further ahead may be slower than we had anticipated,” she said.

– Edward Frankl contributed to this story.

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This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

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