What Makes Bored Ape NFTs So Desirable?
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,613,207 (-0.60%)       Melbourne $969,484 (-0.54%)       Brisbane $991,125 (-0.15%)       Adelaide $906,278 (+1.12%)       Perth $892,773 (+0.03%)       Hobart $726,294 (-0.04%)       Darwin $657,141 (-1.18%)       Canberra $1,003,818 (-0.83%)       National $1,045,092 (-0.37%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $754,460 (+0.43%)       Melbourne $495,941 (+0.11%)       Brisbane $587,365 (+0.63%)       Adelaide $442,425 (-2.43%)       Perth $461,417 (+0.53%)       Hobart $511,031 (+0.36%)       Darwin $373,250 (+2.98%)       Canberra $492,184 (-1.10%)       National $537,029 (+0.15%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,787 (-116)       Melbourne 14,236 (+55)       Brisbane 8,139 (+64)       Adelaide 2,166 (-18)       Perth 5,782 (+59)       Hobart 1,221 (+5)       Darwin 279 (+4)       Canberra 924 (+36)       National 42,534 (+89)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,638 (-81)       Melbourne 8,327 (-30)       Brisbane 1,728 (-19)       Adelaide 415 (+10)       Perth 1,444 (+2)       Hobart 201 (-10)       Darwin 392 (-7)       Canberra 1,004 (-14)       National 22,149 (-149)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 (+$20)       Melbourne $620 ($0)       Brisbane $630 (-$5)       Adelaide $615 (+$5)       Perth $675 ($0)       Hobart $560 (+$10)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 ($0)       National $670 (+$4)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 ($0)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $630 (+$5)       Adelaide $505 (-$5)       Perth $620 (-$10)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $580 (+$20)       Canberra $550 ($0)       National $597 (-$)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,197 (+313)       Melbourne 6,580 (-5)       Brisbane 4,403 (-85)       Adelaide 1,545 (-44)       Perth 2,951 (+71)       Hobart 398 (-13)       Darwin 97 (+4)       Canberra 643 (+11)       National 22,814 (+252)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,884 (-22)       Melbourne 6,312 (0)       Brisbane 2,285 (-54)       Adelaide 357 (-14)       Perth 783 (-14)       Hobart 129 (-14)       Darwin 132 (+6)       Canberra 831 (+15)       National 21,713 (-97)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.64% (↑)      Melbourne 3.33% (↑)        Brisbane 3.31% (↓)       Adelaide 3.53% (↓)       Perth 3.93% (↓)     Hobart 4.01% (↑)      Darwin 5.54% (↑)      Canberra 3.52% (↑)      National 3.34% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.17% (↓)       Melbourne 6.19% (↓)     Brisbane 5.58% (↑)      Adelaide 5.94% (↑)        Perth 6.99% (↓)       Hobart 4.68% (↓)     Darwin 8.08% (↑)      Canberra 5.81% (↑)        National 5.78% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 29.8 (↓)     Melbourne 31.7 (↑)      Brisbane 30.6 (↑)        Adelaide 25.2 (↓)       Perth 35.2 (↓)     Hobart 35.1 (↑)      Darwin 44.2 (↑)        Canberra 31.5 (↓)     National 32.9 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 29.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.5 (↓)     Brisbane 27.8 (↑)        Adelaide 22.8 (↓)     Perth 38.4 (↑)        Hobart 37.5 (↓)       Darwin 37.3 (↓)       Canberra 40.5 (↓)       National 33.1 (↓)           
Share Button

What Makes Bored Ape NFTs So Desirable?

Purchased by celebrities from Justin Bieber to Gwyneth Paltrow these digital avatars promise a vaunted place in the metaverse.

By SOPHIE HAIGNEY
Fri, Feb 25, 2022 1:58pmGrey Clock 4 min

On The Tonight Show in late January, Jimmy Fallon held up a portrait of a cartoon ape wearing a sailor’s hat, a striped shirt and heart-shaped sunglasses. “This is my ape,” he said, as his guest, Paris Hilton, gave it her approval. She also had an ape, which Fallon had earlier shown the audience, a red-furred version wearing sunglasses and an S&M cap. “We’re part of the same community,” Fallon said. “We’re both apes.”

This odd moment between Hilton and Fallon hurtled Bored Ape Yacht Club, a collection of NFTs depicting apes, into the spotlight. Other celebrities were showing off theirs too: In January, Justin Bieber posted a photo on Instagram of his Bored Ape #3001, sometimes called Lonely Bored Ape, which relates to his song “Lonely.” (This ape’s eyes are filled with tears.) Bieber paid $1.29 million for it, according to Etherscan, which tracks blockchain transactions, then went on to purchase a second for $470,000. For many observers, these were record-scratch moments in the middle of a long-running party, the kind of thing that made one wonder: What is going on?

Bored Ape Yacht Club was born in the heady days of April 2021, when the value of cryptocurrency skyrocketed and the market for NFTs exploded. NFT (short for nonfungible token) is a unit of data stored on a blockchain, allowing for a record of who owns what to exist on a decentralized public ledger. Its four founders were pseudonymous, though BuzzFeed News recently identified two of them to be Greg Solano, 32, a writer and editor, and Wylie Aronow, 35. The concept was simple: 10,000 apes, each with a distinct face and outfit, each able to be individually owned.

“The term ape is used affectionately in the crypto community to mean early adopters,” says Nicole Muniz, CEO of Yuga Labs, which was part of the team that created the original ape NFTs, in an email. “We liked the idea of creating a whole collection around apes who became so wealthy because of crypto’s rise, that they became extremely…bored.” Buying an ape also gives one membership to an elite digital club—owners can hang out in Discord servers with like-minded Bored Ape enthusiasts.

A major appeal of Bored Apes is their use as avatars—many owners change their Twitter and WhatsApp and even LinkedIn display pictures to their apes. They draw less from the lo-fi early internet aesthetics of other NFT projects like CryptoPunks and more from comic books and Pokémon cards. The animated apes are frequently absurd; their fur might be cheetah print and their teeth rainbow. They stick out their tongues and smoke cigars and wear cowboy hats or fezzes or large sunglasses. Their use as avatars means the apes come to represent you, or something about you, in a specific digital realm. Last month, Gwyneth Paltrow bought one that, when animated, shows an ape with long blond hair that looks tacked on around its large ears, and big blue eyes—her own features transmuted onto a digital ape.

One reason some are willing to spend big on these apes is that they’re part of one’s outward representation in the burgeoning metaverse, as one might invest in an eye-catching coat or handbag in the physical world. “I’m sort of trying to commit to this being my identity for a while,” says Adam Draper, managing director of Boost VC, a fund that was an early investor in cryptocurrencies, who bought his ape about five months ago for an undisclosed sum that he characterized as “expensive.”

Buying a Bored Ape also means buying the underlying intellectual property to your specific ape’s image—which more and more people are capitalizing by licensing for comic books, film and TV, even licensing images to cannabis companies. Draper says Bored Ape Yacht Club will be “the next Disney.”

“It’s the Disney built by creators,” Draper says. “I believe it’s the fastest bootstrapped way to build IP.

“We are all a part of this community, this club, and we’re all trying to make our own apes more valuable, but by building a comic book series or making a movie or a sculpture, suddenly you’ve created value for the whole network.”

This network effect is what separates Bored Ape Yacht Club from other NFT projects. Athletes like Stephen Curry and Serena Williams, musicians like Eminem, Diplo and Future, and actors like Kevin Hart all own apes. (Many of the high-profile ape owners declined to comment for this article through their representatives.)

“Steph Curry was pretty early to Bored Apes, which makes sense because the NBA has already done partnerships like NBA Top Shot NFTs,” says Mason Nystrom, a senior research analyst at Messari, a crypto-market intelligence platform. “Once you get one celebrity or two, then you get 10, and there’s that flywheel effect.”

The rich and famous flocking to Bored Ape Yacht Club has prompted speculation that some are being given Bored Apes or are paid in exchange for promoting them. Many buy them through MoonPay, a fintech company that builds payment infrastructure for crypto and offers a “concierge service,” which handles the sometimes clunky process of buying NFTs for high-net-worth individuals (celebrities including Post Malone and Fallon have used it to get their Bored Apes). Justin Hamilton, a MoonPay spokesperson, says the service never involves giving Bored Apes to celebrities or paying them, and that it’s a fee-for-service business. Perhaps celebrities simply want them because other celebrities have them, he says.

“It has a lot of similar attributes of other scarce assets, so it’s developed a momentum of its own,” says Hamilton. “It’s sort of like asking, why did the latest Jordan drop become popular, or what’s the magic behind Supreme?”

A Bored Ape is, perhaps above all else, a strange status symbol for a highly particular subset of people.

“This is the Lamborghini of the digital world,” Draper says. “But it’s more effective, because you’re persistently online with it forever, but with a Lamborghini you’re not driving it forever.”



MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Money
The Top 10 highest paid CEOs of the ASX 200 revealed
By Bronwyn Allen 23/07/2024
Money
Is ‘Rizz’ the Secret to Getting Ahead at Work?
By RACHEL FEINTZEIG 23/07/2024
Money
Where Do Economists Think We’re Headed? These Are Their Predictions
By SAM GOLDFARB 23/07/2024
The Top 10 highest paid CEOs of the ASX 200 revealed

Along with pay rates, the latest report from the ACSI shows bonuses are no longer based on exceptional results

By Bronwyn Allen
Tue, Jul 23, 2024 2 min

The CEOs of the ASX 200 were paid a little less in FY23 compared to the year before, but bonuses appear to have become the norm rather than a reward for outstanding results, according to the Australia Council of Superannuation Investors (ACSI). ACSI has released its 23rd annual report documenting the CEOs’ realised pay, which combines base salaries, bonuses and other incentives.

The highest-paid CEO among Australian-domiciled ASX 200 companies in FY23 was Greg Goodman of Goodman Group, with realised pay of $27.34 million. Goodman Group is the ASX 200’s largest real estate investment trust (REIT) with a global portfolio of $80.5 billion in assets. The highest-paid CEO among foreign-domiciled ASX 200 companies was Mick Farrell of ResMed with realised pay of $47.58 million. ResMed manufactures CPAP machines to treat sleep apnoea.

The realised pay for the CEOs of the largest 100 companies by market capitalisation fell marginally from a median of $3.93 million in FY22 to $3.87 million in FY23. This is the lowest median in the 10 years since ACSI began basing its report on realised pay data. The median realised pay for the CEOs of the next largest 100 companies also fell from $2.1million to $1.95 million.

However, 192 of the ASX 200 CEOs took home a bonus, and Ed John, ACSI’s executive manager of stewardship, is concerned that bonuses are becoming “a given”.

“At a time when companies are focused on productivity and performance, it is critical that bonuses are only paid for exceptional outcomes,” Mr John said. He added that boards should set performance thresholds for CEO bonuses at appropriate levels.

ACSI said the slightly lower median realised pay of ASX 200 CEOs indicated greater scrutiny from shareholders was having an impact. There was a record 41 strike votes against executive pay at ASX 300 annual general meetings (AGMs) in 2023. This indicated an increasing number of shareholders were feeling unhappy with the executive pay levels at the companies in which they were invested.

A strike vote means 25 percent or more of shareholders voted against a company’s remuneration report. If a second strike vote is recorded at the next AGM, shareholders can vote to force the directors to stand for re-election.

10 highest-paid ASX 200 CEOs in FY23

1. Mick Farrell, ResMed, $47.58 million*
2. Robert Thomson, News Corporation, $41.53 million*
3. Greg Goodman, Goodman Group, $27.34 million
4. Shemara Wikramanayake, Macquarie Group, $25.32 million
5. Mike Henry, BHP Group, $19.68 million
6. Matt Comyn, Commonwealth Bank, $10.52 million
7. Jakob Stausholm, Rio Tinto, $10.47 million
8. Rob Scott, Wesfarmers, $9.57 million
9. Ron Delia, Amcor, $9.33 million*
10. Colin Goldschmidt, Sonic Healthcare, $8.35 million

Source: ACSI. Foreign-domiciled ASX 200 companies*

MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Property
The two Australian states where it’s a buyers’ market
By Bronwyn Allen 18/06/2024
Property
The faster pathway to building wealth is no longer how much you earn, investors believe
By Bronwyn Allen 11/07/2024
Money
Ozempic Fuels Hunt for Smaller Clothes
By SUZANNE KAPNER 17/06/2024
0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop