As India Overtakes China in Population, Will Its Stock Market, Too?
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    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
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As India Overtakes China in Population, Will Its Stock Market, Too?

The key, say some economists, is to look at the ratio of those who are middle age to those who are older

By MARK HULBERT
Mon, May 8, 2023 7:27amGrey Clock 3 min

Is India’s stock market a better long-term bet than China’s?

Some economists think so, now that India is on track to become the world’s most populous nation. Demography, they believe, is destiny.

While China’s population has long been the largest in the world, the two countries are now neck and neck, at roughly 1.4 billion people each, according to the United Nations. India will be No. 1 sometime this year, if it isn’t there already. And by the year 2100, India’s population is projected to be 1.5 billion, while China’s is projected to be 800 million.

A larger population doesn’t automatically translate into a stronger economy or a better-performing stock market, says Alejandra Grindal, chief economist at Ned Davis Research. The more important variable when projecting economic growth is the size of the working-age population. When it comes to the stock market’s long-term prospects, furthermore, it is the size of “the maturing age population that is important,” she says.

The MO ratio

The indicator that perhaps best captures the relative size of these two groups is the so-called MO ratio, says John Geanakoplos, an economics professor at Yale University. The numerator of this ratio—“M,” for middle-aged—is the number of those ages 40 to 49, while the denominator—“O,” for old—contains those from ages 60 to 69. Prof. Geanakoplos is the co-author of an academic paper, published in 2002, documenting that demographic variables such as the MO ratio historically have been significantly correlated with the stock market.

Prof. Geanakoplos says the correlation stems from the fact that the MO ratio is a good proxy for how many people in a country are saving and investing for retirement relative to how many are withdrawing money from the stock market to pay for their retirement. When the ratio is high, there are more savers and investors relative to spenders, which means that capital will be relatively plentiful and interest rates will be lower than they would otherwise be. That in turn means that the discounted value of companies’ future earnings and dividends will be higher. When the ratio is low, in contrast, interest rates will tend to be higher and the present value of future earnings and dividends will be lower.

Prof. Geanakoplos adds that the absolute level of the MO ratio is less important for the stock market’s prospects than its trend. That poses a special challenge to China’s stock market over the longer term, since the country’s MO ratio is projected to decline precipitously over the next several decades—from its current 1.32 to 0.73 in 2050, according to data from Ned Davis Research. This means there will be nearly a doubling in the number of retirees in China pulling money out of the economy and the stock market between now and 2050, relative to the number who are saving and investing.

“Insofar as demography is destiny” Prof. Geanakoplos says, “the long-term prospects for the Chinese stock market are relatively poor.”

India’s MO ratio, in contrast, is projected to decline at a more moderate pace over the next three decades compared with China’s, from its current 1.98 to 1.34. That means that, though demographic factors will be headwinds to both countries’ stock markets in coming decades, not tailwinds, those headwinds will be stronger in China than in India.

Other factors

Ms. Grindal says that while the impact of population trends shouldn’t be minimised, there are many other factors—both political and economic—that will influence the two countries’ economics and stock markets in coming decades.

To put into perspective the demographic headwinds that China and India will be facing, consider the U.S.’s MO ratio. According to Ned Davis Research data, the ratio is projected to rise from its current 1.01 to 1.31 by the end of the 2030s, before declining to 1.15 by 2050. This increase will come as a surprise to many, given recent media attention to Social Security’s financing shortfall. But, Ms. Grindal points out, the millennial generation “is about the same size, if not slightly larger, than the baby boom population,” and is about to enter the 40-49 age cohort. That’s largely what will cause the U.S. MO ratio to rise. Relative to China and India, in other words, the U.S. MO appears quite favourable.



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The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way

The younger generation will bring a different mindset to how and where their newfound wealth is invested

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, Mar 1, 2024 2 min

There is an enormous global wealth transfer in its beginning stages, whereby one of the largest generations in history – the baby boomers – will pass on their wealth to their millennial children. Knight Frank’s global research report, The Wealth Report 2024, estimates the wealth transfer set to take place over the next two decades in the United States alone will amount to US$90 trillion.

But it’s not just the size of the wealth transfer that is significant. It will also deliver billions of dollars in private capital into the hands of investors with a very different mindset.

Seismic change

Wealth managers say the young and rich have a higher social and environmental consciousness than older generations. After growing up in a world where economic inequality is rife and climate change has caused massive environmental damage, they are seeing their inherited wealth as a means of doing good.

Ben Whattam, co-founder of the Modern Affluence Exchange, describes it as a “seismic change”.

“Since World War II, Western economies have been driven by an overt focus on economic prosperity,” he says. “This has come at the expense of environmental prosperity and has arguably imposed social costs. The next generation is poised to inherit huge sums, and all the research we have commissioned confirms that they value societal and environmental wellbeing alongside economic gain and are unlikely to continue the relentless pursuit of growth at all costs.”

Investing with purpose

Mr Whattam said 66% of millennials wanted to invest with a purpose compared to 49% of Gen Xers. “Climate change is the number one concern for Gen Z and whether they’re rich or just affluent, they see it as their generational responsibility to fix what has been broken by their elders.”

Mike Pickett, director of Cazenove Capital, said millennial investors were less inclined to let a wealth manager make all the decisions.

“Overall, … there is a sense of the next generation wanting to be involved and engaged in the process of how their wealth is managed – for a firm to invest their money with them instead of for them,” he said.

Mr Pickett said another significant difference between millennials and older clients was their view on residential property investment. While property has generated immense wealth for baby boomers, particularly in Australia, younger investors did not necessarily see it as the best path.

“In particular, the low interest rate environment and impressive growth in house prices of the past 15 years is unlikely to be repeated in the next 15,” he said. “I also think there is some evidence that Gen Z may be happier to rent property or lease assets such as cars, and to adopt subscription-led lifestyles.”

Impact investing is a rising trend around the world, with more young entrepreneurs and activist investors proactively campaigning for change in the older companies they are invested in. Millennials are taking note of Gen X examples of entrepreneurs trying to force change. In 2022,  Australian billionaire tech mogul and major AGL shareholder, Mike Cannon-Brookes tried to buy the company so he could shut down its coal operations and turn it into a renewable energy giant. He described his takeover bid as “the world’s biggest decarbonisation project”.

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