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    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,626,679 (+0.44%)       Melbourne $992,456 (-0.10%)       Brisbane $968,463 (-0.68%)       Adelaide $889,622 (+1.18%)       Perth $857,092 (+0.57%)       Hobart $754,345 (-0.49%)       Darwin $661,223 (-0.49%)       Canberra $1,005,502 (-0.28%)       National $1,046,021 (+0.17%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $747,713 (-0.42%)       Melbourne $496,441 (+0.20%)       Brisbane $533,621 (+0.58%)       Adelaide $444,970 (-1.69%)       Perth $447,364 (+2.63%)       Hobart $527,592 (+1.28%)       Darwin $348,895 (-0.64%)       Canberra $508,328 (+4.40%)       National $529,453 (+0.63%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,090 (+30)       Melbourne 14,817 (-21)       Brisbane 7,885 (-45)       Adelaide 2,436 (-38)       Perth 6,371 (-16)       Hobart 1,340 (-9)       Darwin 235 (-2)       Canberra 961 (-27)       National 44,135 (-128)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,781 (+13)       Melbourne 8,195 (-49)       Brisbane 1,592 (-18)       Adelaide 423 (-4)       Perth 1,645 (+13)       Hobart 206 (+7)       Darwin 401 (+2)       Canberra 990 (+1)       National 22,233 (-35)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $800 ($0)       Melbourne $600 ($0)       Brisbane $640 ($0)       Adelaide $600 ($0)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $690 (+$10)       National $662 (+$1)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $760 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 (-$5)       Brisbane $630 (-$5)       Adelaide $495 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $592 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,419 (-30)       Melbourne 5,543 (+77)       Brisbane 3,938 (+95)       Adelaide 1,333 (+21)       Perth 2,147 (-8)       Hobart 388 (-10)       Darwin 99 (-3)       Canberra 582 (+3)       National 19,449 (+145)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,008 (+239)       Melbourne 4,950 (+135)       Brisbane 2,133 (+62)       Adelaide 376 (+20)       Perth 650 (+6)       Hobart 133 (-4)       Darwin 171 (-1)       Canberra 579 (+4)       National 17,000 (+461)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.56% (↓)     Melbourne 3.14% (↑)      Brisbane 3.44% (↑)        Adelaide 3.51% (↓)       Perth 3.94% (↓)     Hobart 3.79% (↑)      Darwin 5.50% (↑)      Canberra 3.57% (↑)      National 3.29% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.29% (↑)        Melbourne 6.08% (↓)       Brisbane 6.14% (↓)     Adelaide 5.78% (↑)        Perth 6.97% (↓)       Hobart 4.44% (↓)     Darwin 8.20% (↑)        Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.82% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 31.1 (↑)      Melbourne 33.3 (↑)      Brisbane 32.4 (↑)      Adelaide 26.5 (↑)      Perth 36.1 (↑)      Hobart 32.7 (↑)        Darwin 33.3 (↓)     Canberra 32.4 (↑)      National 32.2 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 31.7 (↑)      Melbourne 32.1 (↑)      Brisbane 31.5 (↑)        Adelaide 23.9 (↓)     Perth 41.0 (↑)        Hobart 34.0 (↓)       Darwin 44.6 (↓)     Canberra 43.1 (↑)      National 35.3 (↑)            
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Australia’s strongest state economy is no longer on the eastern seaboard

CommSec research reveals this state is leading the country in economic growth, unemployment, construction and dwelling starts

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, May 2, 2024 9:37amGrey Clock 2 min

South Australia is currently the strongest state or territory economy in the country, with economic activity 9.1 percent above its decade-average in the December quarter, according to CommSec research. NSW was second with economic output running 8.6 percent above its long-run average, followed by Victoria with 8.5 percent, the ACT at 8.3 percent and Western Australia at 6 percent.

Economic activity in both Queensland and Tasmania was 4.5 percent above average while the Northern Territory underperformed its long-term average by 0.5 percent.

The CommSec research ranks states and territories on several key economic metrics and compares the latest quarterly data with each area’s decade average. South Australia ranks first on four of the eight key indicators. They are economic growth, unemployment, construction and dwelling starts.

Western Australia ranks first on population growth and business and equipment investment. Population growth has been a key element in Perth and regional Western Australia becomingthe country’s hottest property markets over the past 12 months. CoreLogic figures released this week show home values are up 21.1 percent in Perth and 13.3 percent in the state’s regions.

Despite high inflation, retail spending remained above the long-term average in all states and territories in the December quarter. The ACT led with retail expenditure 12.2 percent higher than its long-term average, followed by Western Australia with 11.3 percent, Victoria at 11.2percent and Queensland at 11.1 percent.

Queensland is in the top spot for new home loans. Propelling this is very strong internal migration and a doubling of the First Home Owners Grant to $30,000 from 20 November last year. New home loans issued to first home buyers in November surged to a 15-month high, according to data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Queensland is currently the second strongest housing market, with home values up 16.1 percent in Brisbane and 11.2 percent in regional areas over the past year.

In all states and territories except the Northern Territory, housing finance commitments remained above decade averages in the December quarter. The value of home loans in Queensland was 21.1 percent higher than the state’s long-term average. The next strongest was Western Australia, up 17.5 percent, South Australia, up 14.2 percent, and the ACT, up 12 percent. The new CoreLogic data reveals 15 consecutive months of growth in the national median price, despite high interest rates.



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How cost of living pressures are impacting the health of Australians

Money worries are having a cascading effect on stress levels, conflict and even the rate of ageing

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, May 9, 2024 3 min

Worrying about the cost of living is causing accelerated ageing, household arguments and creating significant stress, according to new research. More than half of Australians say they have experienced personal setbacks due to financial strain over the past year. Almost 20 percent say that have suffered a stress-related illness, 33 percent have lost sleep and almost one in five are seeing signs of early ageing.

Household hostility is also rising, with 19 percent of Australians admitting they have argued with their partners about money, and a further one in 10 have argued with family and friends.

The Finder survey of 1,070 Australians reveals women are bearing the brunt of financial stress, with 62 percent reporting they have worried about money compared to 42 percent of men.

Younger Australians are struggling the most, with almost 7 in 10 Gen Z respondents reporting financial strain compared to 58 percent of Gen Xers and 24 percent of baby boomers.

The impact of cost-of-living pressures among different age groups and income levels is reflected in new data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The selected living cost indexes show employee households are under more strain from inflation, with the CPI measure for this population group at 6.5 percent today compared to the official overall CPI figure of just 3.6 percent.

The discrepancy is due to higher mortgage interest payments – which make up a higher proportion of expenditure for employee households — as well as an increase in primary and secondary school fees, and the indexation of tertiary education fees at the start of the year. The official CPI does not include mortgage payments, so the living cost indexes provide a more accurate picture of how rising interest rates are impacting households with mortgages today.

The inflation rate is much lower for older Australians, who have often paid off their mortgages. The inflation rate on living expenses for age pensioner households is below the official CPI level at 3.3 percent, and it’s only slightly higher at 3.4 percent for self-funded retirees.

Graham Cooke, head of consumer research at Finder, said that despite cooling inflation, Australians were still under significant financial pressure.

This can be seen in Finders Cost of Living Pressure Gauge, which has been hovering in the extreme range for the past year and a half, Mr Cooke said. The gauge returned a reading of 78 percent in March this year compared to 47 percent in March 2021, when inflation was 1.1 percent and the Reserve Bank’s official cash rate was 0.1 percent.

Interestingly, Australians’ cash savings are higher today than they were in 2021, likely reflecting stimulus payments received and saved during the pandemic. The Reserve Bank has cited pandemic savings as a factor in keeping mortgage arrears low despite much higher interest rates. The Finder research shows Australians have an average of $37,206 in cash savings today, up from $24,928 two years ago.

Money concerns can cause problems in your everyday life and snowball quickly if you don’t get them under control,” Mr Cooke said. Building financial resilience is as vital as ever as costs continue to rise. Pay close attention to where your money is going so you keep impulse spending to a minimum, and don’t overspend.

Australians appear to be heeding this advice, with the latest ABS retail figures showing seven straight quarters of declining per capita spending. “Per capita volumes show retail turnover after the effects of inflation and population growth have been accounted for,” explained Ben Dorber, ABS head of retail statistics. “Following an unprecedented seven straight falls, it is very clear how much consumers have pulled back on spending in response to cost of living pressures over the past two years.

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