Bitcoin Prices Keep Plunging
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    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
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Bitcoin Prices Keep Plunging

With no sign of stopping or where the bottom may be.

By JACK DENTON
Tue, May 10, 2022 9:54amGrey Clock 3 min

Cryptocurrency prices tumbled over the weekend and into Monday, with Bitcoin nearing a yearly low as investors continued to dump risky assets amid a tough stock market and challenging macroeconomic backdrop.

The price of Bitcoin has fallen more than 10.2% over the past 24 hours to roughly $44,000, deepening losses from over the weekend after changing hands around $51,000 on Friday. It puts the largest crypto at its lowest level since July 2021.

The latest selloff brings Bitcoin to less than half the value of its all-time high of $99,180 reached in November 2021, and is a significant move away from the relatively tight range near $57,000 that Bitcoin has been trading around for months.

“Bitcoin has followed the lead of the equity market, extending lower after a weak April,” said Katie Stockton, managing partner at technical research group Fairlead Strategies.

“Short-term momentum has deteriorated,” Stockton said. “Bitcoin is no longer oversold from a short-term perspective. This creates additional risk.”

Ether, the second-largest crypto, was down 10% to below $3590, declining over the weekend after trading around $3,880 on Friday. It’s now changing hands around the lowest levels since 2021.

Smaller cryptos, or “altcoins,” were not spared, declining Monday to further losses since Friday. Solana and Cardano both fell around 12% to 15%. Luna, the token that plays an integral role in maintaining stablecoin TerraUSD’s peg to the U.S. dollar, has dropped more than 30% since Friday after selling pressure saw Terra de-peg over the weekend and Monday. The incident with Terra has also rattled the crypto space more widely.

Memecoins— called that because they were initially intended as internet jokes rather than significant blockchain projects—also fell, with Dogecoin losing 13% and Shiba Inu 16% lower.

Bitcoin and other digital assets should, in theory, trade independently of mainstream financial markets. But the recent selloff in cryptocurrencies largely matches action in the stock market, and Bitcoin has largely shown itself to be correlated with other risk-sensitive assets like stocks, and especially technology stocks.

The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite index has lost more than 25% this year, putting it in bear market territory, while the wider S&P 500 is down 16%. The S&P 500 notched its fifth straight week of losses last Friday, the worst run since 2011, and stocks were headed lower again on Monday.

Investors face a challenging and dynamic monetary policy environment. The Federal Reserve has already moved aggressively to raise interest rates this year, and is only expected to keep going as the central bank fights historically high inflation. This risks significantly denting economic demand, causing a recession.

The continuation of severe Covid-19 lockdowns in China, which threaten to compromise global supply chains, limiting companies’ access to materials and only stoking inflation further, only complicates matters.

Against this backdrop, “risk assets” like tech stocks and cryptos are faring particularly badly as investor sentiment deteriorates, hurt in part because bond yields keep rising.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note neared 3.2% at points on Monday, which would put it on track to close at the highest levels since late 2018. When yields climb, the math is tough for riskier assets: Higher yields reduce the extra return relative to bonds that traders expect to get from taking riskier bets.

So where will cryptos find the bottom? In the near-term, volatility looks expected to continue, and a turnaround may not be coming anytime soon.

“Bitcoin may be on the course to restart a steep downtrend,” said Yuya Hasegawa, an analyst at crypto exchange Bitbank, who sees the largest crypto trading in a range of $30,000 to $38,000 this week.

Looming large in the days ahead is inflation data for April. The U.S. consumer price index (CPI) is due on Wednesday, and investors are likely to latch onto the number as the market keeps revising its estimates for how aggressive Fed policy will be.

If CPI grew more than 8.1% year over year last month, which is around what markets expect, investors could take that as a sign that the Fed will move more aggressively—and this could lead to continued selling.

“Although it will not be enough to reverse the market’s sentiment completely, lower CPI readings will suffice to support the price of Bitcoin temporarily,” said Hasegawa. “Until then, the price has to maintain the $33,000 psychological level, which is also around the 2022 low, to prevent the technical sentiment from aggravating further.”

Another negative sign for the crypto market is that institutional money may be leading the price pressure, according to Marcus Sotiriou, an analyst at digital asset broker GlobalBlock. Sotiriou said that, preceding the recent drop, the price for Bitcoin listed on exchange Coinbase Global (ticker: COIN) was at a discount compared to the Binance exchange.

“This is telling as a greater percentage of institutions use Coinbase compared to retail, whereas the opposite is the case for Binance,” Sotiriou said. “The price mismatch mentioned suggests institutions are not currently as interested as retail.”

Reprinted by permission of Barron’s. Copyright 2021 Dow Jones & Company. Inc. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Original date of publication: May 8, 2022.



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The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way

The younger generation will bring a different mindset to how and where their newfound wealth is invested

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There is an enormous global wealth transfer in its beginning stages, whereby one of the largest generations in history – the baby boomers – will pass on their wealth to their millennial children. Knight Frank’s global research report, The Wealth Report 2024, estimates the wealth transfer set to take place over the next two decades in the United States alone will amount to US$90 trillion.

But it’s not just the size of the wealth transfer that is significant. It will also deliver billions of dollars in private capital into the hands of investors with a very different mindset.

Seismic change

Wealth managers say the young and rich have a higher social and environmental consciousness than older generations. After growing up in a world where economic inequality is rife and climate change has caused massive environmental damage, they are seeing their inherited wealth as a means of doing good.

Ben Whattam, co-founder of the Modern Affluence Exchange, describes it as a “seismic change”.

“Since World War II, Western economies have been driven by an overt focus on economic prosperity,” he says. “This has come at the expense of environmental prosperity and has arguably imposed social costs. The next generation is poised to inherit huge sums, and all the research we have commissioned confirms that they value societal and environmental wellbeing alongside economic gain and are unlikely to continue the relentless pursuit of growth at all costs.”

Investing with purpose

Mr Whattam said 66% of millennials wanted to invest with a purpose compared to 49% of Gen Xers. “Climate change is the number one concern for Gen Z and whether they’re rich or just affluent, they see it as their generational responsibility to fix what has been broken by their elders.”

Mike Pickett, director of Cazenove Capital, said millennial investors were less inclined to let a wealth manager make all the decisions.

“Overall, … there is a sense of the next generation wanting to be involved and engaged in the process of how their wealth is managed – for a firm to invest their money with them instead of for them,” he said.

Mr Pickett said another significant difference between millennials and older clients was their view on residential property investment. While property has generated immense wealth for baby boomers, particularly in Australia, younger investors did not necessarily see it as the best path.

“In particular, the low interest rate environment and impressive growth in house prices of the past 15 years is unlikely to be repeated in the next 15,” he said. “I also think there is some evidence that Gen Z may be happier to rent property or lease assets such as cars, and to adopt subscription-led lifestyles.”

Impact investing is a rising trend around the world, with more young entrepreneurs and activist investors proactively campaigning for change in the older companies they are invested in. Millennials are taking note of Gen X examples of entrepreneurs trying to force change. In 2022,  Australian billionaire tech mogul and major AGL shareholder, Mike Cannon-Brookes tried to buy the company so he could shut down its coal operations and turn it into a renewable energy giant. He described his takeover bid as “the world’s biggest decarbonisation project”.

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