Falling Food Prices Ease Upward Pressure On Global Inflation
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,655,505 (-0.06%)       Melbourne $994,898 (+0.02%)       Brisbane $991,841 (+1.33%)       Adelaide $889,373 (+1.26%)       Perth $861,566 (+0.49%)       Hobart $729,893 (-1.65%)       Darwin $669,344 (+0.35%)       Canberra $999,769 (+1.27%)       National $1,055,910 (+0.34%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $749,436 (-0.10%)       Melbourne $494,327 (+0.46%)       Brisbane $554,094 (+2.77%)       Adelaide $439,361 (-1.14%)       Perth $456,655 (-0.27%)       Hobart $524,871 (-0.43%)       Darwin $349,455 (+1.52%)       Canberra $494,554 (-1.96%)       National $530,871 (+0.07%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,048 (-72)       Melbourne 14,823 (-272)       Brisbane 7,999 (+9)       Adelaide 2,372 (-66)       Perth 6,238 (-89)       Hobart 1,265 (-29)       Darwin 232 (-6)       Canberra 1,020 (0)       National 43,997 (-525)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,719 (-61)       Melbourne 8,033 (-189)       Brisbane 1,615 (-4)       Adelaide 391 (-5)       Perth 1,570 (-29)       Hobart 203 (-10)       Darwin 394 (-6)       Canberra 1,010 (+7)       National 21,935 (-297)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 ($0)       Melbourne $600 (-$10)       Brisbane $640 ($0)       Adelaide $610 ($0)       Perth $670 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 ($0)       National $668 (-$1)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 (-$25)       Melbourne $550 ($0)       Brisbane $630 ($0)       Adelaide $500 ($0)       Perth $640 (+$13)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $513 (+$13)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $589 (-$2)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,497 (+71)       Melbourne 5,818 (+35)       Brisbane 4,141 (+99)       Adelaide 1,399 (0)       Perth 2,377 (+32)       Hobart 400 (+17)       Darwin 111 (+17)       Canberra 604 (+9)       National 20,347 (+280)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,083 (+248)       Melbourne 4,637 (+100)       Brisbane 2,182 (-27)       Adelaide 393 (+2)       Perth 731 (-10)       Hobart 130 (-7)       Darwin 144 (-8)       Canberra 684 (+72)       National 17,984 (+370)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.58% (↑)        Melbourne 3.14% (↓)       Brisbane 3.36% (↓)       Adelaide 3.57% (↓)       Perth 4.04% (↓)     Hobart 3.92% (↑)        Darwin 5.44% (↓)       Canberra 3.54% (↓)       National 3.29% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.20% (↓)       Melbourne 5.79% (↓)       Brisbane 5.91% (↓)     Adelaide 5.92% (↑)      Perth 7.29% (↑)      Hobart 4.46% (↑)      Darwin 7.63% (↑)      Canberra 5.99% (↑)        National 5.77% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 30.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.5 (↑)      Brisbane 31.7 (↑)        Adelaide 25.7 (↓)     Perth 35.4 (↑)      Hobart 33.7 (↑)        Darwin 36.2 (↓)     Canberra 32.0 (↑)        National 32.1 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 31.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.9 (↑)      Brisbane 32.1 (↑)        Adelaide 24.8 (↓)       Perth 38.7 (↓)     Hobart 37.6 (↑)        Darwin 46.5 (↓)     Canberra 39.2 (↑)        National 35.3 (↓)           
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Falling Food Prices Ease Upward Pressure On Global Inflation

Agricultural markets remain volatile due to war and hot weather.

By DAVID HARRISON
Tue, Aug 2, 2022 10:30amGrey Clock 4 min

Falling prices for commodities such as wheat or corn are set to slow consumer food price increases, easing pressure on a major driver of global inflation.

But economists warn it is too soon to declare victory. Agricultural markets remain volatile and the continuing war in Ukraine, combined with unusually hot and dry weather in Europe and parts of the U.S., could bring new disruptions to food supplies.

“We’ll see certainly in the short run adjustments in prices,” said Rob Vos, an economist at the International Food Policy Research Institute. “I would be very cautious in making big projections that things are stabilizing and getting better because we still are in a pretty difficult and tight situation.”

Supply problems caused by the Covid-19 pandemic sent the price of food soaring last year. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February of this year added additional pressure. The two countries combined accounted for 28% of global wheat exports last year and 15% of corn exports. Russia is also a major exporter of agricultural fertilizer, and Ukraine leads the world in sunflower oil exports.

The onset of the war pushed up global food prices by 13% in March from the previous month, according to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization.

Prices have edged down since, and in June, they were about 3% below March levels, though they remain higher than before the war started, according to the FAO.

Futures markets point to continued price declines. Wheat futures prices are now roughly where they were before Feb. 24, when Russia began its invasion of Ukraine. Corn prices are at their lowest level so far this year.

A recent agreement between Russia and Ukraine allowing exports of Ukrainian wheat could help cool global prices. After the agreement was signed, Russia attacked two of Ukraine’s biggest ports, Odessa and Mykolaiv, which handle much of the country’s food exports, raising doubts about Russia’s adherence to the deal.

The recent decline in commodity prices has already started to show up in consumer prices in some countries, and economists expect further moderation in coming months.

Annual food inflation in Colombia has eased from its peak in April, even though it remains historically high, according to government statistics. In Egypt, food prices fell on a monthly basis in June, the government reported.

In the U.S., Wingstop Inc., a restaurant chain, said it had started seeing falling chicken prices. “We are benefiting from meaningful deflation in bone-in wings,” said Chief Executive Officer Michael Skipworth in an earnings call.

J.P. Morgan economists now forecast global food inflation rates falling by half to around 5.5% or 6% in the fourth quarter of this year from around 13% in the second quarter.

That would make a big difference in emerging markets, where food accounts for a greater share of consumer spending than in developed economies. Easing food inflation could bring inflation down by 1.5 percentage points globally and 2 percentage points in emerging markets, J.P. Morgan estimates. That could take some pressure off central banks, many of which have been raising interest rates to bring inflation under control.

The U.S. could also see food prices moderate. Agricultural economists, though, say the effect at U.S. grocery stores could be muted. Commodities contribute only about 15% of retail food costs, with labour, shipping, packaging, advertising and profit margins contributing the rest, said Jayson Lusk, an agricultural economist at Purdue University.

Lower commodity prices “certainly can’t hurt,” he said. “From the consumers’ perspective it’s a positive sign that maybe we’ll see some downward pressure or at least a reduction in the increase.”

U.S. consumer food prices, both at grocery stores and restaurants, were up 10.4% in June from the previous year, the highest in more than four decades, according to the Labor Department. Food inflation accounted for roughly 1.4 percentage points of the 9.1% overall inflation rate in June, according to the Labor Department.

Higher prices are prompting some consumers to pull back or switch to cheaper brands. Unilever PLC and Kraft Heinz Co., which own many major food brands, both reported last week that higher commodity costs had forced them to raise prices even though that meant losing some customers.

Mr. Vos said food commodity prices are going down for the wrong reasons. Rather than signalling easing supply constraints, the price declines are a reflection of the dollar’s strength and an expectation that demand will decline as global growth cools, he said.

Since commodities are priced in U.S. dollars, a rise in the value of the dollar tends to push down the price for commodities, to offset the more expensive currency, Mr. Vos said. At the same time, central bank interest-rate increases to curb inflation have raised the risk of a global recession, he said.

On Tuesday, the International Monetary Fund lowered its forecast for global growth and raised it for inflation, as China’s Covid-19 lockdowns, rampant inflation and the war in Ukraine continue to weigh on the world economy.

“There are a few things on the horizon for me that say we may not be done with higher food prices,” said Scott Brown, an agricultural economist at the University of Missouri.

Chief among them are war and weather. Hot and dry weather in Spain, Italy and parts of the U.S. will lower rice production next year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates, which could raise rice prices.

The agency says global wheat and corn production will fall by 1% and 2.6%, respectively, next year. Ukraine will see its wheat output fall 41% and its exports by almost half, according to the USDA.

“There are just so many uncertainties or unknowns right now, if I was a consumer I’d expect a lot of volatility in food prices ahead,” Mr. Brown said.



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The consumer price index (CPI) rose in April to an annual rate of 3.6 percent, which was 0.1 percent higher than in March, raising doubts about an interest rate cut this year as inflation starts looking stickier than expected. This is the second consecutive month of small rises, potentially indicating that Australia is experiencing the same stalled progress in bringing inflation down that is being seen in the United States, as both nations approach their central banks’ target inflation bands.

In Australia, the target inflation band is 2 to 3 percent, with the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) aiming to achieve the midpoint under its new agreement with the Federal Government following a formal review. In its interest rate decision-making, the RBA does not give as much weight to the monthly inflation data because not all prices are measured like they are in the quarterly data. On a quarterly basis, inflation has continued to fall. In the March quarter, the annual rate of inflation was 3.6 percent, down from 4.1 percent in December, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

CBA economist Stephen Wu noted the April data was above the bank’s forecast of 3.5 percent as well as the industrywide consensus forecast of 3.4 percent. He predicts the next leg down in inflation won’t be until the September quarter, when we will see the effects of electricity rebates and a likely smaller minimum wage increase to be announced by the Fair Work Commission next month compared to June 2023.

The most significant contributor to the April inflation rise were housing costs, which rose 4.9 percent on an annual basis. This reflects a continuing rise in weekly rents amid near-record low vacancy rates across the country, as well as significantly higher labour and materials costs which builders are passing on to the buyers of new homes, as well as renovators.

The second biggest contributor was food and non-alcoholic beverages, up 3.8 percent annually, reflecting higher prices for fruit and vegetables in April. The ABS said unfavourable weather led to a reduced supply of berries, bananas and vegetables such as broccoli. The annual rate of inflation for alcohol and tobacco rose by 6.5 percent, and transport rose by 4.2 percent due to higher fuel prices.

Robert Carnell, the Asia Pacific head of research at ING, said they no longer expect a rate cut this year after seeing the April data. Mr Carnell said an increase in trend inflation was apparent and “rate cuts this year look unlikely”. In the RBA’s latest monetary policy statement, published before the April CPI was released, it said: “Inflation is expected to be higher in the near term than previously thought due to the stronger labour market and higher petrol prices. But inflation is still expected to return to the target range in the second half of 2025 and to reach the midpoint in 2026.”

 

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Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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