Finding your financial feet after a fall in fortunes
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,603,134 (+0.55%)       elbourne $989,193 (-0.36%)       Brisbane $963,516 (+0.83%)       Adelaide $873,972 (+1.09%)       Perth $833,820 (+0.12%)       Hobart $754,479 (+3.18%)       Darwin $668,319 (-0.54%)       Canberra $993,398 (-1.72%)       National $1,033,710 (+0.29%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $748,302 (+0.18%)       Melbourne $497,833 (-0.44%)       Brisbane $540,964 (-1.56%)       Adelaide $441,967 (-0.38%)       Perth $442,262 (+1.33%)       Hobart $525,313 (+0.38%)       Darwin $347,105 (-0.72%)       Canberra $496,490 (+0.93%)       National $528,262 (-0.02%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,189 (-104)       Melbourne 14,713 (+210)       Brisbane 7,971 (+283)       Adelaide 2,420 (+58)       Perth 6,383 (+298)       Hobart 1,336 (+6)       Darwin 228 (-12)       Canberra 1,029 (+8)       National 44,269 (+747)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,795 (-1)       Melbourne 8,207 (+293)       Brisbane 1,636 (+1)       Adelaide 421 (-4)       Perth 1,664 (+15)       Hobart 204 (-1)       Darwin 404 (-2)       Canberra 988 (+12)       National 22,319 (+313)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $800 (+$5)       Melbourne $600 ($0)       Brisbane $640 (+$10)       Adelaide $600 ($0)       Perth $660 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $690 ($0)       National $663 (+$2)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 ($0)       Melbourne $590 (+$10)       Brisbane $630 ($0)       Adelaide $490 (+$10)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $475 (+$23)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $570 (+$5)       National $593 (+$4)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,364 (+80)       Melbourne 5,428 (+4)       Brisbane 4,002 (+12)       Adelaide 1,329 (+16)       Perth 2,113 (+91)       Hobart 398 (0)       Darwin 99 (-5)       Canberra 574 (+39)       National 19,307 (+237)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 7,687 (+257)       Melbourne 4,793 (+88)       Brisbane 2,098 (+33)       Adelaide 354 (-11)       Perth 650 (+5)       Hobart 135 (-1)       Darwin 176 (-9)       Canberra 569 (+14)       National 16,462 (+376)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.59% (↑)      Melbourne 3.15% (↑)      Brisbane 3.45% (↑)        Adelaide 3.57% (↓)       Perth 4.12% (↓)       Hobart 3.79% (↓)     Darwin 5.45% (↑)      Canberra 3.61% (↑)      National 3.33% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.21% (↓)     Melbourne 6.16% (↑)      Brisbane 6.06% (↑)      Adelaide 5.77% (↑)        Perth 7.05% (↓)     Hobart 4.70% (↑)      Darwin 8.24% (↑)        Canberra 5.97% (↓)     National 5.84% (↑)             HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)        Hobart 1.4% (↓)     Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 29.7 (↑)      Melbourne 30.9 (↑)      Brisbane 31.2 (↑)      Adelaide 25.1 (↑)      Perth 34.4 (↑)      Hobart 35.8 (↑)      Darwin 35.9 (↑)      Canberra 30.4 (↑)      National 31.7 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 30.0 (↑)      Melbourne 30.5 (↑)      Brisbane 28.8 (↑)        Adelaide 25.2 (↓)       Perth 38.3 (↓)       Hobart 27.8 (↓)     Darwin 45.8 (↑)      Canberra 38.1 (↑)      National 33.1 (↑)            
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Finding your financial feet after a fall in fortunes

In these uncertain times, knowing how to pick yourself up after a financial setback is crucial

By Mercedes Maguire
Mon, Jun 19, 2023 1:40pmGrey Clock 5 min

Floods, bushfires, a pandemic, a cost of living crisis and even a mouse plague — there has been a lot to contend with in the past few years which has rocked our financial stability.  And that’s before we add in the human elements of relationship and health breakdowns.

But while it may feel like there is no recovering from a bankruptcy, the loss of your home or the closure of your business, the experts want you to know one thing – you can survive a financial setback.

For more stories like this, order the winter 2023 issue of Kanebridge Quarterly here.

Sandra Blake has spent decades counselling Australians who have faced every type of financial strain and setback. And since March 2020 — when the Small Business Debt Helpline was established following the 2019 floods in Queensland and the 2019-20 Black Summer bushfires in NSW — Blake has turned to helping small business owners.

“Many of our (small business) clients have been affected by multiple disasters — mouse plague, bushfires and drought — but also changes in their personal relationships which can lead to health or mental health problems,” Blake says. “Also, changes in the economy, which has meant their consumer clients have less income to spend, has affected them.

“We speak to suicidal people regularly and unfortunately that seems to be happening more frequently. 

“But I want people to take away one message: sometimes it may seem like there are no good options available to get you out of your situation, but there is always a pathway out — always.”

The rate of personal insolvencies — a legal agreement you reach with your creditors to pay an agreed amount of your debt over a period of time if you can no longer afford to pay the full debt — increased in January, according to the Australian Financial Security Authority. There were 772 new personal insolvencies in January, up from 612 in December 2022. Of those, 414 were bankruptcies and 344 were debt agreements.

Mortgage stress, which is considered to occur when 30 to 35 per cent of your household income goes towards the mortgage, is also on the increase. With more than 10 interest rate hikes since April 2022, it is estimated more than 1.3 million Australians face mortgage stress, according to financial services company, Octivo.

A survey by comparison site Finder also reported four in five people were stressed about their financial situation in March.

So, what can you do if you find yourself suffering from debt or facing a financial setback? Finder’s money expert Sarah Megginson says you need to first know exactly where you stand financially before you can find a way out.

1) What is the state of play: “Drawing up a budget can help you prioritise your expenses and allocate your resources effectively,” Megginson says.

2) Ask the tough questions: “Can you negotiate your way out of this by offering to make part-payments or establish payment plans,” she asks. “Are you looking at bankruptcy and if so, what does that look like and what impact will it have on your lifestyle?”

Sarah Megginson says making an honest assessment of your financial position is the starting point

But even those two starting points sound a little easier said than done. Blake says you don’t have to do this all yourself. A financial counsellor can offer free and completely anonymous help and they are highly qualified in the area of financial recovery.

“There are lots of ways we can help; we can help you create a payment plan with your creditor or even enter into an informal debt agreement which in most instances comes with a debt reduction,” she says. “For example, you can negotiate with your creditor to pay $12,000 out of the $20,000 debt in a payment plan.”

She says this is where it’s handy to have a financial counsellor who can negotiate on your behalf. 

“A utilities or telco company may not accept a debt reduction plan from an individual, but they may accept one from a financial counsellor because enlisting the help of a counsellor shows that person has a genuine commitment to getting out of debt,” she says.

Jane Monica-Jones is a financial therapist who helps people get back on their feet mentally

Jane Monica-Jones is a finance therapist, so she’s a mental health practitioner rather than a financial counsellor, and often works with people who face chronic financial problems. She says the psychological recovery is key.

“A significant hit not only ruptures your financial situation but ruptures your mental health,” the co-founder of the Financial Wellbeing Company says. 

“As circumstances change externally, like with your finances, it can wobble your sense of resilience and confidence,” Monica-Jones says.

“I help people fight chronic financial strain, not crisis strain. I try to stabilise them, to help them once they have weathered the immediate crisis, but may find that they’re still not thriving. We build on what is working in their life; I tell them ‘you got on this call today, you got the kids to school – all of that is working.’” 

She says it can help to focus on the small picture, not the big one.

“The work I do operates hand in hand with a financial counsellor, we assist different parts of the person’s financial setback.”

Starting afresh

Espen Harbitz’s boutique hotel, restaurant and bar, The Oriana Orange, was open for three years when Covid hit. Like thousands of regional business owners, Harbitz took a financial hit when he had to close his doors for a three-month shut down — not once, but twice.

But the savvy businessman from central NSW, who credits himself with always looking for the positive, took the closure as a chance to     re-evaluate his business.

“Having to close the doors gave me the opportunity to re-evaluate my business structure and create a very clear plan for the opportunities ahead of us,” he says. “It gave me the chance to do things that would otherwise have been too difficult to do.

“I had the hotel bathrooms re-tiled and renovated and the outdoor bar space incorporated into the indoor bar area, doubling the space.

“It also gave me the chance to look at how best to celebrate the seasons in Orange and incorporate that into the business, like outdoor fire pits for the garden in winter.”

The downtime risks paid off.

Harbitz was able to expand his business — which includes the 50-room hotel, a bar with two saloons, a 90-seat indoor restaurant and a 200-seat outdoor eatery — and his staff grew from 35 to 50 since Covid. 



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How much income is required to service a mortgage? It depends on where you live

New research suggests spending 40 percent of household income on loan repayments is the new normal

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, Apr 25, 2024 3 min

Requiring more than 30 percent of household income to service a home loan has long been considered the benchmark for ‘housing stress’. Yet research shows it is becoming the new normal. The 2024 ANZ CoreLogic Housing Affordability Report reveals home loans on only 17 percent of homes are ‘serviceable’ if serviceability is limited to 30 percent of the median national household income.

Based on 40 percent of household income, just 37 percent of properties would be serviceable on a mortgage covering 80 percent of the purchase price. ANZ CoreLogic suggest 40 may be the new 30 when it comes to home loan serviceability. “Looking ahead, there is little prospect for the mortgage serviceability indicator to move back into the 30 percent range any time soon,” says the report.

“This is because the cash rate is not expected to be cut until late 2024, and home values have continued to rise, even amid relatively high interest rate settings.” ANZ CoreLogic estimate that home loan rates would have to fall to about 4.7 percent to bring serviceability under 40 percent.

CoreLogic has broken down the actual household income required to service a home loan on a 6.27 percent interest rate for an 80 percent loan based on current median house and unit values in each capital city. As expected, affordability is worst in the most expensive property market, Sydney.

Sydney

Sydney’s median house price is $1,414,229 and the median unit price is $839,344.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $211,456 to afford a home loan for a house and $125,499 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $120,554.

Melbourne

Melbourne’s median house price is $935,049 and the median apartment price is $612,906.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $139,809 to afford a home loan for a house and $91,642 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $110,324.

Brisbane

Brisbane’s median house price is $909,988 and the median unit price is $587,793.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $136,062 to afford a home loan for a house and $87,887 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $107,243.

Adelaide

Adelaide’s median house price is $785,971 and the median apartment price is $504,799.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $117,519 to afford a home loan for a house and $75,478 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $89,806.

Perth

Perth’s median house price is $735,276 and the median unit price is $495,360.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $109,939 to afford a home loan for a house and $74,066 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $108,057.

Hobart

Hobart’s median house price is $692,951 and the median apartment price is $522,258.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $103,610 to afford a home loan for a house and $78,088 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $89,515.

Darwin

Darwin’s median house price is $573,498 and the median unit price is $367,716.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $85,750 to afford a home loan for a house and $54,981 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $126,193.

Canberra

Canberra’s median house price is $964,136 and the median apartment price is $585,057.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $144,158 to afford a home loan for a house and $87,478 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $137,760.

 

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35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

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