Stocks Suffer Worst Day Since June 2020 | Kanebridge News
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    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,516,817 (-0.06%)       Melbourne $971,359 (-1.00%)       Brisbane $819,969 (+2.77%)       Adelaide $731,547 (+1.72%)       Perth $621,459 (+0.34%)       Hobart $751,359 (-0.46%)       Darwin $633,554 (-4.02%)       Canberra $1,005,229 (+2.77%)       National $966,406 (+0.40%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $700,089 (-0.30%)       Melbourne $470,277 (-0.26%)       Brisbane $404,718 (+2.58%)       Adelaide $332,602 (+1.44%)       Perth $348,181 (-0.09%)       Hobart $551,005 (+2.68%)       Darwin $355,689 (-3.55%)       Canberra $477,440 (+4.12%)       National $484,891 (+0.89%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,451 (-507)       Melbourne 12,654 (-279)       Brisbane 9,158 (+847)       Adelaide 2,765 (-40)       Perth 9,974 (+39)       Hobart 595 (+36)       Darwin 247 (-1)       Canberra 666 (-49)       National 44,510 (+46)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,895 (+164)       Melbourne 8,149 (-24)       Brisbane 2,260 (+33)       Adelaide 649 (+5)       Perth 2,489 (-21)       Hobart 101 (-3)           Canberra 430 (+13)       National 23,351 (+167)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $630 $0       Melbourne $470 $0       Brisbane $460 ($0)       Adelaide $495 (+$5)       Perth $500 ($0)       Hobart $550 $0       Darwin $600 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $562 (+$)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $540 (+$10)       Melbourne $410 (+$2)       Brisbane $460 (+$10)       Adelaide $380 $0       Perth $440 (-$10)       Hobart $450 $0       Darwin $500 ($0)       Canberra $550 $0       National $473 (+$2)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,470 (-50)       Melbourne 7,404 (-70)       Brisbane 1,986 (-122)       Adelaide 875 (-29)       Perth 1,838 (-38)       Hobart 254 (+18)       Darwin 70 (-3)       Canberra 388 (+17)       National 18,285 (-277)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,652 (+58)       Melbourne 9,001 (-180)       Brisbane 1,567Brisbane 1,679 (-62)       Adelaide 403 (+4)       Perth 1,050 (-21)       Hobart 87 (+1)       Darwin 131 (-10)       Canberra 453 (+43)       National 23,344 (-167)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.16% (↑)      Melbourne 2.52% (↑)        Brisbane 2.92% (↓)       Adelaide 3.52% (↓)       Perth 4.18% (↓)     Hobart 3.81% (↑)      Darwin 4.92% (↑)        Canberra 3.62% (↓)       National 3.03% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 4.01% (↑)      Melbourne 4.53% (↑)        Brisbane 5.91% (↓)       Adelaide 5.94% (↓)       Perth 6.57% (↓)       Hobart 4.25% (↓)     Darwin 7.31% (↑)        Canberra 5.99% (↓)       National 5.07% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND         Sydney 1.5% (↓)       Melbourne 1.9% (↓)       Brisbane 0.6% (↓)       Adelaide 0.5% (↓)       Perth 1.0% (↓)     Hobart 0.8% (↑)        Darwin 0.9% (↓)       Canberra 0.6% (↓)     National 1.2%        National 1.2% (↓)            UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND         Sydney 2.3%ey 2.4% (↓)       Melbourne 3.0% (↓)       Brisbane 1.3% (↓)       Adelaide 0.7% (↓)     Perth 1.3% (↑)        Hobart 1.2% (↓)     Darwin 1.1% (↑)        Canberra 1.6% (↓)     National 2.1%       National 2.1% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 31.2 (↓)       Melbourne 30.9 (↓)       Brisbane 35.7 (↓)       Adelaide 27.6 (↓)       Perth 40.5 (↓)       Hobart 30.2 (↓)       Darwin 27.1 (↓)     Canberra 28.1 (↑)        National 31.4 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 33.7 (↓)       Melbourne 32.6 (↓)       Brisbane 34.8 (↓)       Adelaide 29.5 (↓)       Perth 46.6 (↓)       Hobart 27.4 (↓)       Darwin 38.2 (↓)       Canberra 30.2 (↓)       National 34.1 (↓)           
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Stocks Suffer Worst Day Since June 2020

Annual inflation eased to 8.3% in August but came in higher than economists anticipated

By KAREN LANGLEY
Wed, Sep 14, 2022 8:51amGrey Clock 3 min

Stocks suffered their worst day in more than two years after hotter-than-expected inflation data dashed investors’ hopes that cooling price pressures would prompt the US Federal Reserve to moderate its campaign of interest-rate increases.

Investors sold everything from stocks and bonds to oil and gold. All 30 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined, as did all 11 sectors in the S&P 500. Only five stocks in the broad benchmark finished the session in the green. Facebook parent Meta Platforms dropped 9.4%, BlackRock declined 7.5% and Boeing fell 7.2%.

The Dow fell 1276.37 points, or 3.9%, to 31104.97. The S&P 500 declined 177.72 points, or 4.3%, to 3932.69. The Nasdaq Composite slid 632.84 points, or 5.2%, to 11633.57.

All three indexes posted their steepest one-day losses since June 11, 2020. The declines left the Dow industrials down 14% in 2022, while the S&P 500 has lost 17% and the Nasdaq Composite has retreated 26%.

Investors had eagerly anticipated Tuesday’s release of the consumer-price index, which provided a last major look at inflation before the central bank’s interest-rate-setting committee meets next week. Expectations for the path of monetary policy have held sway over the markets as investors factor higher rates into asset prices and try to project how well the economy will hold up as rates rise.

“It increases the probability of recession if the Fed has to move more significantly to address inflation,” said Chris Shipley, chief investment strategist for North America at Northern Trust Asset Management.

The new data showed the consumer-price index rose 8.3% in August from the same month a year ago. That was down from 8.5% in July and 9.1% in June—the highest inflation rate in four decades.

The figures show inflation is easing, but at a slower pace than investors and economists had anticipated. Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal had been expecting consumer prices to rise 8% annually in August.

Analysts had hoped that officials would consider easing their pace of interest-rate increases if data continued to show inflation subsiding. The data undercut those hopes, seeming to settle the case for the Fed to raise rates by at least 0.75 percentage point next week. After the release, stock futures fell, bond yields rose and the dollar rallied.

Traders began to consider the possibility that the central bank will raise interest rates by a full percentage point next week.

As of Tuesday afternoon, they assigned a 34% probability to a 1-percentage-point increase at that meeting, up from a 0% chance a day earlier, according to CME Group’s FedWatch Tool.

The market-based probability of a half-percentage-point increase, by contrast, fell to 0% from 9% on Monday, according to the CME data.

The most likely scenario remained an increase of 0.75 percentage point.

Beyond next week, the suggestion that inflation is sticking around raises the possibility that the Fed might ultimately raise rates higher than markets had been anticipating.

“That’s really the challenge,” said Matt Forester, chief investment officer of Lockwood Advisors at BNY Mellon Pershing. “The Fed might have to do a lot more work in order to contain inflation.”

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said earlier this month that the central bank is squarely focused on bringing down high inflation to prevent it from becoming entrenched as it did in the 1970s.

With Tuesday’s declines, the S&P 500 is up 7.3% from its June low. While investors broadly expect volatility to continue shaking the stock market, some suspect the economy remains strong enough to avert a major leg lower from here.

“We think a lot of the weakness is likely in the price at this stage,” said Holly MacDonald, chief investment officer at Bessemer Trust.

Still, the reaction to the new inflation reading could be seen across asset classes on Tuesday.

The communication services, technology and consumer discretionary sectors of the S&P 500 all fell more than 5%. Semiconductor stocks were particularly hard hit: Nvidia, Advanced Micro Devices and Micron Technology declined more than 7%.

In bond markets, the yield on the benchmark 10-year U.S. Treasury note jumped to 3.422%—near its highest level of 2022—from 3.361% Monday. Meanwhile, the yield on the two-year note, which is more sensitive to near-term rate expectations, settled at 3.754%, the highest since 2007. Yields and prices move in opposite directions. The rise in bond yields was an additional sign that investors were expecting higher interest rates after the data.

Brent crude, the international benchmark for oil prices, fell 0.9% to $93.17 a barrel. Gold prices declined 1.3%.

The U.S. dollar, by contrast, rallied Tuesday. The WSJ Dollar Index, which measures the greenback against a basket of other currencies, rose 1.4% in its largest one-day gain since March 2020. The strong dollar has weighed on the value of other currencies against the greenback this year.

Overseas, the pan-continental Stoxx Europe 600 fell about 1.5%. In Asia, major indexes closed mixed. South Korea’s Kospi Composite rallied 2.7% , while Hong Kong’s Hang Seng declined 0.2%.

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RMIT expert says a conflation of factors is making the property market hard than ever to predict

By Robyn Willis
Thu, Oct 6, 2022 9:52am < 1 min

A leading property academic has described navigating the current Australian housing market ‘like steering a ship through a thick fog while trying to avoid obstacles’.

Lecturer in RMIT’s School of Property Construction and Project Management Dr Woon-Weng Wong said the combination of consecutive interest rate rises aimed at combating high inflation, higher property prices during the pandemic and cost of living pressures such as the end of the fuel excise that occurred this week made it increasingly difficult for those looking to enter or upgrade to find the right path.

“Property prices grew by approximately 25 percent over the pandemic so it’s unsurprising that much of that growth ultimately proved unsustainable and the market is now correcting itself,” Dr Wong says. “Despite the recent softening, the market is still significantly above its long-term trend and there are substantial headwinds in the coming months. Headline inflation is still red hot, and the central bank won’t back down until it reins in these spiralling prices.” 

This should be enough to give anyone considering entering the market pause, he says.

“While falling house prices may seem like an ideal situation for those looking to buy, once the high interest rates, taxes and other expenses are considered, the true costs of owning the property are much higher,” Dr Wong says. 

“People also must consider time lags in the rate hikes, which many are yet to feel to brunt of. It can take anywhere from 6 to 24 months before an initial change in interest rates eventually flows on to the rest of the economy, so current mortgage holders and prospective home buyers need to take this into account.” 

 

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