Tesla Surpasses US$1 Trillion in Market Value
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,599,192 (-0.51%)       Melbourne $986,501 (-0.24%)       Brisbane $938,846 (+0.04%)       Adelaide $864,470 (+0.79%)       Perth $822,991 (-0.13%)       Hobart $755,620 (-0.26%)       Darwin $665,693 (-0.13%)       Canberra $994,740 (+0.67%)       National $1,027,820 (-0.13%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $746,448 (+0.19%)       Melbourne $495,247 (+0.53%)       Brisbane $534,081 (+1.16%)       Adelaide $409,697 (-2.19%)       Perth $437,258 (+0.97%)       Hobart $531,961 (+0.68%)       Darwin $367,399 (0%)       Canberra $499,766 (0%)       National $525,746 (+0.31%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,586 (+169)       Melbourne 15,093 (+456)       Brisbane 7,795 (+246)       Adelaide 2,488 (+77)       Perth 6,274 (+65)       Hobart 1,315 (+13)       Darwin 255 (+4)       Canberra 1,037 (+17)       National 44,843 (+1,047)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,675 (+47)       Melbourne 7,961 (+171)       Brisbane 1,636 (+24)       Adelaide 462 (+20)       Perth 1,749 (+2)       Hobart 206 (+4)       Darwin 384 (+2)       Canberra 914 (+19)       National 21,987 (+289)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $770 (-$10)       Melbourne $590 (-$5)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $595 (-$5)       Perth $650 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $700 ($0)       National $654 (-$3)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $730 (+$10)       Melbourne $580 ($0)       Brisbane $620 ($0)       Adelaide $470 ($0)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $460 (-$10)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $560 (-$5)       National $583 (+$1)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,253 (-65)       Melbourne 5,429 (+1)       Brisbane 3,933 (-4)       Adelaide 1,178 (+17)       Perth 1,685 ($0)       Hobart 393 (+25)       Darwin 144 (+6)       Canberra 575 (-22)       National 18,590 (-42)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,894 (-176)       Melbourne 4,572 (-79)       Brisbane 1,991 (+1)       Adelaide 377 (+6)       Perth 590 (+3)       Hobart 152 (+6)       Darwin 266 (+10)       Canberra 525 (+8)       National 15,367 (-221)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 2.50% (↓)       Melbourne 3.11% (↓)       Brisbane 3.43% (↓)       Adelaide 3.58% (↓)     Perth 4.11% (↑)      Hobart 3.78% (↑)      Darwin 5.47% (↑)        Canberra 3.66% (↓)       National 3.31% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 5.09% (↑)        Melbourne 6.09% (↓)       Brisbane 6.04% (↓)     Adelaide 5.97% (↑)        Perth 7.14% (↓)       Hobart 4.50% (↓)       Darwin 7.78% (↓)       Canberra 5.83% (↓)       National 5.76% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.7% (↑)      Melbourne 0.8% (↑)      Brisbane 0.4% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 1.2% (↑)      Hobart 0.6% (↑)      Darwin 1.1% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.4% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.3% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.5% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.3% (↑)        National 0.9% (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND         Sydney 28.7 (↓)       Melbourne 30.7 (↓)       Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 25.4 (↓)       Perth 34.0 (↓)       Hobart 34.8 (↓)       Darwin 35.1 (↓)       Canberra 28.5 (↓)       National 31.0 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND         Sydney 25.8 (↓)       Melbourne 30.2 (↓)       Brisbane 27.6 (↓)       Adelaide 21.8 (↓)       Perth 37.8 (↓)       Hobart 25.2 (↓)       Darwin 24.8 (↓)       Canberra 41.1 (↓)       National 29.3 (↓)           
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Tesla Surpasses US$1 Trillion in Market Value

Hertz ordered 100,000 vehicles from the electric marque.

By Dave Sebastian
Tue, Oct 26, 2021 10:38amGrey Clock 4 min

Tesla Inc. crossed US$1 trillion in market value Monday, joining a select group of companies after its stock price more than doubled this past year on surging vehicle sales and rising profits.

Investors pushed the electric-vehicle maker over the line after Hertz Global Holdings Inc. ordered 100,000 autos to be delivered to the rental-car company by the end of next year, a bulk purchase that promises to expose more mainstream drivers to Tesla’s technology.

Apple Inc. Microsoft Corp., Amazon.com Inc., Google parent Alphabet Inc. are the only other U.S. companies worth more US$1 trillion. Facebook Inc. was part of the group, though its share price has since retreated. Tesla, which last week reported record quarterly profit, is worth more than the next nine largest auto makers by market capitalization combined.

“Wild $T1mes!” Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk tweeted Monday afternoon. He added, of the Hertz order: “Strange that moved valuation, as Tesla is very much a production ramp problem, not a demand problem.”

Tesla’s stock closed at $1024.86, up more than 12% on the day and giving the company a market value of $1.03 trillion.

Tesla’s valuation has soared unusually quickly. It took less than two years for Tesla’s market value to grow from $100 billion to $1 trillion, according to Dow Jones Market Data. By contrast, it took Amazon more than eight years to cover that ground.

The run-up in Tesla’s share price has benefited Mr. Musk, the company’s largest shareholder and world’s wealthiest person. Mr. Musk’s Tesla holdings, including vested and unvested options, were worth roughly US$297 billion as of Monday, according to corporate-governance data company Equilar Inc. That is more than the valuation of Toyota Motor Corp., the second-largest automaker by market capitalization.

Hertz’s Tesla order is part of a broader effort by the rental company to give customers more battery-powered options on rental-car lots.

The Estero, Fla., company said that starting in early November and expanding through the end of the year, Hertz customers will be able to rent a Tesla Model 3 at airports and other locations in major U.S. markets and some cities in Europe.

Financial terms of the deal between Hertz and Tesla weren’t provided. Based on list prices, the cost to Hertz would top $4 billion; however, historically it is common for such bulk orders to include a discount for the rental-car company.

Electric vehicles will comprise more than 20% of the company’s global fleet with the current order, Hertz said Monday. The rental-car company said it introduced electric vehicles into its fleet in 2011.

The order represents a major chunk of Tesla’s annual production volume, which has been growing in recent years. The electric-car maker delivered nearly half a million vehicles globally last year and, based on performance through September, is in a position to deliver nearly 900,000 vehicles to customers this year.

While the Hertz deal should allow more people to drive Teslas, it comes as scrutiny of Tesla’s advanced driver-assistance features has intensified. On Monday, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board doubled down on earlier criticism, chastising Tesla for not addressing what the agency views as safety deficiencies in the company’s driver-assistance technology.

“[O]ur crash investigations involving your company’s vehicles have clearly shown that the potential for misuse requires a system design change to ensure safety,” NTSB Chair Jennifer Homendy said in a letter to Mr. Musk.

The NTSB investigates crashes and makes safety recommendations but doesn’t have regulatory authority. The agency has urged Tesla to take additional steps to limit how drivers are able to use the company’s advanced driver-assistance technology, which doesn’t make vehicles autonomous.

Tesla didn’t respond to a request for comment about the letter.

Hertz’s purchase could help elevate its profile as it anticipates relisting on a major stock exchange by the end of the year. Hertz shares, which currently trade over the counter, rose roughly 10% to $27.17.

Hertz is making the investment after emerging from bankruptcy under new ownership. It filed for bankruptcy in May 2020 as the debt-laden company suffered from a collapse in reservations.

The expansion into electric vehicles is part of what the company defines as “the new Hertz,” which focuses on electrification, shared mobility and a digital-first experience, the company said. Hertz’s new owners seek to overhaul the century-old company, implementing new software to improve inventory management and better forecast customer demand.

“Electric vehicles are now mainstream, and we’ve only just begun to see rising global demand and interest,” said Mark Fields, Hertz’s interim chief executive. Mr. Fields, a former Ford Motor Co. CEO, took the role earlier this month.

The company said it also has partnered with Super Bowl champion Tom Brady for a marketing campaign for the electric-vehicle rentals.

Hertz warned that efforts to electrify its fleet could be hampered by factors outside its control, such as the shortage of semiconductors and other constraints.

Tesla has a network of charging stations for its vehicles to augment those people install in their homes. Tesla users, at times, have complained about long wait periods at charging facilities.

“While we certainly have work to do in expanding capacity in some congested areas, average congestion on the network has decreased over the past 18 months,” Tesla senior vice president Andrew Baglino said on an earnings call this month. The Tesla charging network, he said, has doubled over the past 18 months and the company plans for it to triple over the next two years.

Tesla says on its website that it has more than 25,000 charging stations worldwide, principally in North America and Europe. Hertz said it is also installing thousands of electric-vehicle chargers in its network.

Reprinted by permission of The Wall Street Journal, Copyright 2021 Dow Jones & Company. Inc. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Original date of publication: October 25, 2021.



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The Great Wealth Transfer: How rich millennials will invest the billions coming their way

The younger generation will bring a different mindset to how and where their newfound wealth is invested

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, Mar 1, 2024 2 min

There is an enormous global wealth transfer in its beginning stages, whereby one of the largest generations in history – the baby boomers – will pass on their wealth to their millennial children. Knight Frank’s global research report, The Wealth Report 2024, estimates the wealth transfer set to take place over the next two decades in the United States alone will amount to US$90 trillion.

But it’s not just the size of the wealth transfer that is significant. It will also deliver billions of dollars in private capital into the hands of investors with a very different mindset.

Seismic change

Wealth managers say the young and rich have a higher social and environmental consciousness than older generations. After growing up in a world where economic inequality is rife and climate change has caused massive environmental damage, they are seeing their inherited wealth as a means of doing good.

Ben Whattam, co-founder of the Modern Affluence Exchange, describes it as a “seismic change”.

“Since World War II, Western economies have been driven by an overt focus on economic prosperity,” he says. “This has come at the expense of environmental prosperity and has arguably imposed social costs. The next generation is poised to inherit huge sums, and all the research we have commissioned confirms that they value societal and environmental wellbeing alongside economic gain and are unlikely to continue the relentless pursuit of growth at all costs.”

Investing with purpose

Mr Whattam said 66% of millennials wanted to invest with a purpose compared to 49% of Gen Xers. “Climate change is the number one concern for Gen Z and whether they’re rich or just affluent, they see it as their generational responsibility to fix what has been broken by their elders.”

Mike Pickett, director of Cazenove Capital, said millennial investors were less inclined to let a wealth manager make all the decisions.

“Overall, … there is a sense of the next generation wanting to be involved and engaged in the process of how their wealth is managed – for a firm to invest their money with them instead of for them,” he said.

Mr Pickett said another significant difference between millennials and older clients was their view on residential property investment. While property has generated immense wealth for baby boomers, particularly in Australia, younger investors did not necessarily see it as the best path.

“In particular, the low interest rate environment and impressive growth in house prices of the past 15 years is unlikely to be repeated in the next 15,” he said. “I also think there is some evidence that Gen Z may be happier to rent property or lease assets such as cars, and to adopt subscription-led lifestyles.”

Impact investing is a rising trend around the world, with more young entrepreneurs and activist investors proactively campaigning for change in the older companies they are invested in. Millennials are taking note of Gen X examples of entrepreneurs trying to force change. In 2022,  Australian billionaire tech mogul and major AGL shareholder, Mike Cannon-Brookes tried to buy the company so he could shut down its coal operations and turn it into a renewable energy giant. He described his takeover bid as “the world’s biggest decarbonisation project”.

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