The generational investment divide for Australians
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,655,505 (-0.06%)       Melbourne $994,898 (+0.02%)       Brisbane $991,841 (+1.33%)       Adelaide $889,373 (+1.26%)       Perth $861,566 (+0.49%)       Hobart $729,893 (-1.65%)       Darwin $669,344 (+0.35%)       Canberra $999,769 (+1.27%)       National $1,055,910 (+0.34%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $749,436 (-0.10%)       Melbourne $494,327 (+0.46%)       Brisbane $554,094 (+2.77%)       Adelaide $439,361 (-1.14%)       Perth $456,655 (-0.27%)       Hobart $524,871 (-0.43%)       Darwin $349,455 (+1.52%)       Canberra $494,554 (-1.96%)       National $530,871 (+0.07%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,048 (-72)       Melbourne 14,823 (-272)       Brisbane 7,999 (+9)       Adelaide 2,372 (-66)       Perth 6,238 (-89)       Hobart 1,265 (-29)       Darwin 232 (-6)       Canberra 1,020 (0)       National 43,997 (-525)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,719 (-61)       Melbourne 8,033 (-189)       Brisbane 1,615 (-4)       Adelaide 391 (-5)       Perth 1,570 (-29)       Hobart 203 (-10)       Darwin 394 (-6)       Canberra 1,010 (+7)       National 21,935 (-297)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $820 ($0)       Melbourne $600 (-$10)       Brisbane $640 ($0)       Adelaide $610 ($0)       Perth $670 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $680 ($0)       National $668 (-$1)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 (-$25)       Melbourne $550 ($0)       Brisbane $630 ($0)       Adelaide $500 ($0)       Perth $640 (+$13)       Hobart $450 ($0)       Darwin $513 (+$13)       Canberra $570 ($0)       National $589 (-$2)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,497 (+71)       Melbourne 5,818 (+35)       Brisbane 4,141 (+99)       Adelaide 1,399 (0)       Perth 2,377 (+32)       Hobart 400 (+17)       Darwin 111 (+17)       Canberra 604 (+9)       National 20,347 (+280)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,083 (+248)       Melbourne 4,637 (+100)       Brisbane 2,182 (-27)       Adelaide 393 (+2)       Perth 731 (-10)       Hobart 130 (-7)       Darwin 144 (-8)       Canberra 684 (+72)       National 17,984 (+370)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.58% (↑)        Melbourne 3.14% (↓)       Brisbane 3.36% (↓)       Adelaide 3.57% (↓)       Perth 4.04% (↓)     Hobart 3.92% (↑)        Darwin 5.44% (↓)       Canberra 3.54% (↓)       National 3.29% (↓)            UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.20% (↓)       Melbourne 5.79% (↓)       Brisbane 5.91% (↓)     Adelaide 5.92% (↑)      Perth 7.29% (↑)      Hobart 4.46% (↑)      Darwin 7.63% (↑)      Canberra 5.99% (↑)        National 5.77% (↓)            HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)      Hobart 1.4% (↑)      Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 30.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.5 (↑)      Brisbane 31.7 (↑)        Adelaide 25.7 (↓)     Perth 35.4 (↑)      Hobart 33.7 (↑)        Darwin 36.2 (↓)     Canberra 32.0 (↑)        National 32.1 (↓)            AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 31.3 (↑)      Melbourne 31.9 (↑)      Brisbane 32.1 (↑)        Adelaide 24.8 (↓)       Perth 38.7 (↓)     Hobart 37.6 (↑)        Darwin 46.5 (↓)     Canberra 39.2 (↑)        National 35.3 (↓)           
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The generational investment divide for Australians

A new report on the impact of cost of living pressures reveals a stark contrast between age groups in investment strategies

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, May 17, 2024 10:36amGrey Clock 3 min

Four in five Australians say they have changed their investment and savings goals over the past 12 months, with 44 percent doing so primarily to make ends meet during the costofliving crisis. A further 25 percent say theyve switched strategies to protect their wealth against inflation, according to a new survey by financial advisory firm, Findex.

The Superannuation and Retirement Insights report shows Australians have also changed their goals to grow their wealth (31 percent), to create a regular income stream (29 percent) and to reduce taxes (17 percent). Transferring wealth to their children or other family members has motivated 10 percent of Australians to alter their investment plans, which is likely reflective of the increasing role played by the Bank of Mum and Dad in young people’s first home purchases.

The report found that traditional investment avenues, such as property and superannuation, remain the most popular choices, with more than eight out of 10 survey respondents ranking these asset classes highly. But there is also an increasing inclination towards investments that offer the potential for quicker returns, additional perceived safety, and better liquidity or accessibility to funds.

Eighty percent of survey respondents also nominated bank savings as among their top five investment choices right now, followed by shares (66 percent) and cash (51 percent).

This shift reflects a broader strategy to mitigate current financial uncertainties, balancing the pursuit of long-term wealth accumulation with the need for immediate financial security,” the report says.

While superannuation is considered a cornerstone investment for retirement and long-term wealth accumulation, 85 percent of Australians are exploring investments outside superannuation. The most common investments outside super are bank savings (64 percent), property (38 percent), cash (35 percent) and shares (34 percent).

However, when the data is broken down by generation, stark differences are revealed in how each age cohort chooses to invest their spare income and why.

Most popular investments outsider super and the motivations to invest by generation

Baby Boomers (born 1965-1964)

Outside superannuation, Baby Boomers prefer to invest in bank savings (60 percent), property (50 percent) and shares (46 percent).

By far, their primary motivation for investing is planning for retirement (80 percent). They also want to build wealth (51 percent) and support their children or other family members (25 percent). Other motivations include preserving wealth to beat inflation (22 percent) and paying off a mortgage or other debt (20 percent). They are the least likely generation to be saving for an investment property.

Gen Xers (born 19651980)

Gex Xers prefer to invest in bank savings (57 percent), property (43 percent) and shares (36 percent).

They are motivated to invest for retirement (66 percent), to build wealth (50 percent), to save for emergencies (36 percent), and to pay off a mortgage or other debt (30 percent). Interestingly, Gen X is the generation most concerned with supporting their children or family members (33 percent). This may be because Gen Xers have grown up during Australia’s long-standing property boom that began in the late 1990s and continues today.

Millennials (born 1981-1996)

Millennials have the strongest interest in bank savings as an investment avenue (70 percent), followed by property at 41 percent. They also like cash (35 percent) and shares (33 percent). Millennials have the highest uptake of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) at 21 percent. ETFs are a relatively new type of asset class, with the first ones trading on the ASX in 2001. ETFs are a basket of shares that can be purchased in a single transaction for instant diversification. Millennials are also the generation most interested in cryptocurrencies, with 22 percent invested.

Their biggest motivations for investing are to build wealth (55 percent), save for emergencies (50 percent) and plan for retirement (49 percent). They also want to support their kids (32 percent) and pay off their mortgage (32 percent). Millennials are the generation most likely to be saving for an investment property (28 percent) rather than a first home (17 percent).

Gen Zs (born 1997-2009)

Gen Zs spread their money across more asset classes than their elders. They like investing in bank savings (66 percent), cash (42 percent), shares (22 percent), ETFs (17 percent), property (14 percent) and cryptocurrencies (13 percent).

While Gen Zs are the youngest age cohort within the survey, they also have long-term goals just like their elders. The biggest motivation to invest among Gen Zs is to build wealth (52 percent). More Gen Zs are saving for a first home than any other generation, with 42 percent pursuing this goal. They are also the generation most concerned with preserving wealth to beat inflation (29 percent). Gen Zs also want short-term security, with 46 percent saving for emergencies. They’re also the generation most likely to be saving for other major purchases like a car or holiday (41 percent) and investing just for enjoyment (26 percent).



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The sticky economic factor making an interest rate drop unlikely this year

It’s a key indicator in the RBA board’s decision making process, but it is proving difficult to move in the right direction

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, May 30, 2024 2 min

The consumer price index (CPI) rose in April to an annual rate of 3.6 percent, which was 0.1 percent higher than in March, raising doubts about an interest rate cut this year as inflation starts looking stickier than expected. This is the second consecutive month of small rises, potentially indicating that Australia is experiencing the same stalled progress in bringing inflation down that is being seen in the United States, as both nations approach their central banks’ target inflation bands.

In Australia, the target inflation band is 2 to 3 percent, with the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) aiming to achieve the midpoint under its new agreement with the Federal Government following a formal review. In its interest rate decision-making, the RBA does not give as much weight to the monthly inflation data because not all prices are measured like they are in the quarterly data. On a quarterly basis, inflation has continued to fall. In the March quarter, the annual rate of inflation was 3.6 percent, down from 4.1 percent in December, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

CBA economist Stephen Wu noted the April data was above the bank’s forecast of 3.5 percent as well as the industrywide consensus forecast of 3.4 percent. He predicts the next leg down in inflation won’t be until the September quarter, when we will see the effects of electricity rebates and a likely smaller minimum wage increase to be announced by the Fair Work Commission next month compared to June 2023.

The most significant contributor to the April inflation rise were housing costs, which rose 4.9 percent on an annual basis. This reflects a continuing rise in weekly rents amid near-record low vacancy rates across the country, as well as significantly higher labour and materials costs which builders are passing on to the buyers of new homes, as well as renovators.

The second biggest contributor was food and non-alcoholic beverages, up 3.8 percent annually, reflecting higher prices for fruit and vegetables in April. The ABS said unfavourable weather led to a reduced supply of berries, bananas and vegetables such as broccoli. The annual rate of inflation for alcohol and tobacco rose by 6.5 percent, and transport rose by 4.2 percent due to higher fuel prices.

Robert Carnell, the Asia Pacific head of research at ING, said they no longer expect a rate cut this year after seeing the April data. Mr Carnell said an increase in trend inflation was apparent and “rate cuts this year look unlikely”. In the RBA’s latest monetary policy statement, published before the April CPI was released, it said: “Inflation is expected to be higher in the near term than previously thought due to the stronger labour market and higher petrol prices. But inflation is still expected to return to the target range in the second half of 2025 and to reach the midpoint in 2026.”

 

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11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

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Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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