Elon Musk, Other Leaders Sell Stock at Historic Levels
Kanebridge News
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,603,134 (+0.55%)       elbourne $989,193 (-0.36%)       Brisbane $963,516 (+0.83%)       Adelaide $873,972 (+1.09%)       Perth $833,820 (+0.12%)       Hobart $754,479 (+3.18%)       Darwin $668,319 (-0.54%)       Canberra $993,398 (-1.72%)       National $1,033,710 (+0.29%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $748,302 (+0.18%)       Melbourne $497,833 (-0.44%)       Brisbane $540,964 (-1.56%)       Adelaide $441,967 (-0.38%)       Perth $442,262 (+1.33%)       Hobart $525,313 (+0.38%)       Darwin $347,105 (-0.72%)       Canberra $496,490 (+0.93%)       National $528,262 (-0.02%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 10,189 (-104)       Melbourne 14,713 (+210)       Brisbane 7,971 (+283)       Adelaide 2,420 (+58)       Perth 6,383 (+298)       Hobart 1,336 (+6)       Darwin 228 (-12)       Canberra 1,029 (+8)       National 44,269 (+747)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,795 (-1)       Melbourne 8,207 (+293)       Brisbane 1,636 (+1)       Adelaide 421 (-4)       Perth 1,664 (+15)       Hobart 204 (-1)       Darwin 404 (-2)       Canberra 988 (+12)       National 22,319 (+313)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $800 (+$5)       Melbourne $600 ($0)       Brisbane $640 (+$10)       Adelaide $600 ($0)       Perth $660 ($0)       Hobart $550 ($0)       Darwin $700 ($0)       Canberra $690 ($0)       National $663 (+$2)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $750 ($0)       Melbourne $590 (+$10)       Brisbane $630 ($0)       Adelaide $490 (+$10)       Perth $600 ($0)       Hobart $475 (+$23)       Darwin $550 ($0)       Canberra $570 (+$5)       National $593 (+$4)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 5,364 (+80)       Melbourne 5,428 (+4)       Brisbane 4,002 (+12)       Adelaide 1,329 (+16)       Perth 2,113 (+91)       Hobart 398 (0)       Darwin 99 (-5)       Canberra 574 (+39)       National 19,307 (+237)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 7,687 (+257)       Melbourne 4,793 (+88)       Brisbane 2,098 (+33)       Adelaide 354 (-11)       Perth 650 (+5)       Hobart 135 (-1)       Darwin 176 (-9)       Canberra 569 (+14)       National 16,462 (+376)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.59% (↑)      Melbourne 3.15% (↑)      Brisbane 3.45% (↑)        Adelaide 3.57% (↓)       Perth 4.12% (↓)       Hobart 3.79% (↓)     Darwin 5.45% (↑)      Canberra 3.61% (↑)      National 3.33% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND         Sydney 5.21% (↓)     Melbourne 6.16% (↑)      Brisbane 6.06% (↑)      Adelaide 5.77% (↑)        Perth 7.05% (↓)     Hobart 4.70% (↑)      Darwin 8.24% (↑)        Canberra 5.97% (↓)     National 5.84% (↑)             HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.8% (↑)      Melbourne 0.7% (↑)      Brisbane 0.7% (↑)      Adelaide 0.4% (↑)      Perth 0.4% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.8% (↑)      Canberra 1.0% (↑)      National 0.7% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 0.9% (↑)      Melbourne 1.1% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.5% (↑)      Perth 0.5% (↑)        Hobart 1.4% (↓)     Darwin 1.7% (↑)      Canberra 1.4% (↑)      National 1.1% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 29.7 (↑)      Melbourne 30.9 (↑)      Brisbane 31.2 (↑)      Adelaide 25.1 (↑)      Perth 34.4 (↑)      Hobart 35.8 (↑)      Darwin 35.9 (↑)      Canberra 30.4 (↑)      National 31.7 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 30.0 (↑)      Melbourne 30.5 (↑)      Brisbane 28.8 (↑)        Adelaide 25.2 (↓)       Perth 38.3 (↓)       Hobart 27.8 (↓)     Darwin 45.8 (↑)      Canberra 38.1 (↑)      National 33.1 (↑)            
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Elon Musk, Other Leaders Sell Stock at Historic Levels

Insiders like the Waltons, Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s co-founders have sold $63.5 billion.

By Tripp Mickle
Mon, Dec 13, 2021 9:28amGrey Clock 5 min

Company founders and leaders are unloading their stock at historic levels, with some selling shares in their businesses for the first time in years, amid soaring market valuations and ahead of possible changes in U.S. and some state tax laws.

So far this year, 48 top executives have collected more than $200 million each from stock sales, nearly four times the average number of insiders from 2016 through 2020, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of data from the research firm InsiderScore.

The wave has included super sellers such as cosmetics billionaire Ronald Lauder and Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, who have sold shares for the first time in four years or more as the economic recovery fueled strong growth in sales and profit. Other high-profile insiders—including the Walton family, heirs to the Walmart Inc. fortune, and Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive of Facebook parent Meta Platforms Inc.—have accelerated sales and are on track to break recent records for the number of shares they have sold.

Across the S&P 500, insiders have sold a record $63.5 billion in shares through November, a 50% increase from all of 2020, driven both by stock-market gains and an increase in sales by some big holders. The technology sector has led with $41 billion in sales across the entire market, up by more than a third, with a smaller amount but an even bigger increase in financial services.

“What you’re seeing is unprecedented” in recent years, said Daniel Taylor, an accounting professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School who studies trading by executives and directors. He said 2021 marks the most sales he can recall by insiders in a decade, resembling waves of sales during the twilight of the early 2000s dot-com boom.

Insiders have a long history of selling at peaks and buying in troughs, Mr. Taylor said.

Investors sometimes worry that large sales by insiders mean they don’t expect significant further share-price increases, and big, unexpected sales can weigh on share prices. Companies often require top executives to hold stakes equivalent to several times their annual salary, but many high-profile executives easily exceed those thresholds even after selling.

Executives aren’t required to say why they sold, and few do. The heaviest selling came as lawmakers in Washington hashed out potential tax increases as part of the Democrats’ Build Back Better legislative package, at times considering raising the long-term capital-gains tax rate. In November, insiders unloaded a collective $15.59 billion.

The legislation, pending in the Senate, imposes a 5% tax on adjusted gross income above $10 million beginning in 2022, and another 3% on income over $25 million, including capital gains from stock sales. Congressional revenue estimates assume taxpayers will accelerate capital gains in 2021. Wealthy taxpayers could save up to $8 million in taxes on every $100 million of shares sold ahead of the effective date, Mr. Taylor said. Such potential tax savings have been “a powerful incentive to sell this year,” he said.

Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk, considered the world’s richest person, with a net worth of about $270 billion, ridiculed a proposed tax on billionaires’ unrealised capital gains, saying on Twitter that eventually the government runs “out of other people’s money and then they come for you.” He has moved to sell more than $10 billion in Tesla stock over about a month—including roughly $4 billion to cover tax withholding on option exercises—in his first sale of company shares since 2010, other than sales designated as made solely to satisfy tax-withholding obligations.

Microsoft Corp. CEO Satya Nadella last month sold half his total stake, for about $374 million before taxes. Analysts said the move could be related to Washington state instituting a 7% tax for long-term capital gains next year. A Microsoft spokesman said at the time that the sale was for “personal financial planning and diversification reasons.”

Another spike in insider-stock sales occurred in May when company leaders sold off $13.12 billion in shares, following strong corporate earnings reports.

The Journal examined data on company leaders’ stock transactions through Dec. 3, drawn from regulatory filings by InsiderScore. Sales marked as made solely to satisfy tax withholding requirements were excluded. Aggregate figures, through Nov. 30, exclude sales by major shareholders who aren’t also executives or directors.

About a dozen high-profile founders and CEOs sold millions of dollars in company shares this year after selling none in all of 2020, in several cases selling for the first time in five or 10 years.

Messrs. Page and Brin last sold stock in Google parent Alphabet Inc. at about $800 a share in 2017, according to InsiderScore. When they returned to the market in May, shares had risen to $2,200. This year, they have each sold nearly 600,000 shares for about $1.5 billion before taxes. Each still owns about 6% of Alphabet, according to FactSet.

The duo’s sales came as the company reported record revenues and profits more than doubled from a year earlier, and seven months after the Justice Department and state attorneys general filed a civil antitrust lawsuit against Google. The company’s share price reached an all-time high of $3,019.33 on Nov. 19, and has since pulled back to about $2,950.

An Alphabet spokesman declined to comment. Messrs. Brin and Page didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Mr. Lauder, the son of Estée Lauder Cos.’ founders, has shed just over two million shares this year, for more than $600 million before taxes in his first sales since 2016.

Dell Technologies Inc.’s Michael Dell and the Carlyle Group’s David Rubenstein also came off the sidelines over the past year. Mr. Dell sold five million shares for nearly $253 million before taxes, his first since taking Dell public again in 2018. Mr. Rubenstein sold 11 million shares this year for $495 million before taxes, after making his first-ever sale in November 2020. His sales have followed him stepping aside as co-CEO and transitioning into a role as co-chairman.

A spokesman for Mr. Lauder declined to comment. Spokespeople for Mr. Dell didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Other insiders continued selling but at a faster clip this year. The Walton family quadrupled the number of shares its members sold, receiving $6.5 billion before taxes so far in 2021, from $1.5 billion in 2020. The sales came in a year when Walmart’s share price flirted with all-time highs, and the company posted higher sales in three quarters.

Mr. Zuckerberg increased the number of Meta shares he sold nearly sevenfold from a year ago, collecting nearly $4.5 billion before taxes. His selling came as the company reported record sales and earnings, despite challenges presented by iPhone privacy changes and congressional hearings over harms from its platforms following the Journal’s Facebook Files series.

Walmart and Meta spokespeople said the sales are generally governed by preset trading plans. They said the Walton family’s proceeds help fund nonprofit initiatives, and Mr. Zuckerberg’s fund the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative LLC, his family’s for-profit philanthropic company.

Executives often sell shares under advance trading arrangements, dubbed 10b5-1 plans, that trigger sales on a fixed schedule or at price thresholds to avoid running afoul of insider-trading rules. The plans were used in almost two-thirds of stock sales last year—up from 30% in 2004—but some investors and regulators worry they can be abused. The Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday is scheduled to vote on a proposal that would change the rules governing the trading plans.

Finance executive Charles Schwab sold the most shares since 2015 in the company he founded, Charles Schwab Corp.: 5.3 million shares for $361 million.

“People are clearly being opportunistic,” said Ben Silverman, InsiderScore’s director of research. “These guys have been telling you all year that the market is overheated.”

Soaring stock prices mean some executives raised the same amount of money, or more, selling fewer shares. Snap Inc. CEO Evan Spiegel set a price target to sell between $60 and $80, receiving a total of $710 million before taxes on 10 million shares—more than doubling his 2020 proceeds despite selling three million fewer shares.

Amazon.com Inc. founder Jeff Bezos typically sells about $10 billion in stock annually to help fund his space venture, Blue Origin LLC. This year, he has sold 25% fewer shares while collecting roughly the same amount of money before taxes because the company’s share price has doubled over the past two years.



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How much income is required to service a mortgage? It depends on where you live

New research suggests spending 40 percent of household income on loan repayments is the new normal

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, Apr 25, 2024 3 min

Requiring more than 30 percent of household income to service a home loan has long been considered the benchmark for ‘housing stress’. Yet research shows it is becoming the new normal. The 2024 ANZ CoreLogic Housing Affordability Report reveals home loans on only 17 percent of homes are ‘serviceable’ if serviceability is limited to 30 percent of the median national household income.

Based on 40 percent of household income, just 37 percent of properties would be serviceable on a mortgage covering 80 percent of the purchase price. ANZ CoreLogic suggest 40 may be the new 30 when it comes to home loan serviceability. “Looking ahead, there is little prospect for the mortgage serviceability indicator to move back into the 30 percent range any time soon,” says the report.

“This is because the cash rate is not expected to be cut until late 2024, and home values have continued to rise, even amid relatively high interest rate settings.” ANZ CoreLogic estimate that home loan rates would have to fall to about 4.7 percent to bring serviceability under 40 percent.

CoreLogic has broken down the actual household income required to service a home loan on a 6.27 percent interest rate for an 80 percent loan based on current median house and unit values in each capital city. As expected, affordability is worst in the most expensive property market, Sydney.

Sydney

Sydney’s median house price is $1,414,229 and the median unit price is $839,344.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $211,456 to afford a home loan for a house and $125,499 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $120,554.

Melbourne

Melbourne’s median house price is $935,049 and the median apartment price is $612,906.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $139,809 to afford a home loan for a house and $91,642 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $110,324.

Brisbane

Brisbane’s median house price is $909,988 and the median unit price is $587,793.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $136,062 to afford a home loan for a house and $87,887 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $107,243.

Adelaide

Adelaide’s median house price is $785,971 and the median apartment price is $504,799.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $117,519 to afford a home loan for a house and $75,478 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $89,806.

Perth

Perth’s median house price is $735,276 and the median unit price is $495,360.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $109,939 to afford a home loan for a house and $74,066 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $108,057.

Hobart

Hobart’s median house price is $692,951 and the median apartment price is $522,258.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $103,610 to afford a home loan for a house and $78,088 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $89,515.

Darwin

Darwin’s median house price is $573,498 and the median unit price is $367,716.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $85,750 to afford a home loan for a house and $54,981 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $126,193.

Canberra

Canberra’s median house price is $964,136 and the median apartment price is $585,057.

Based on 40 percent serviceability, households need a total income of $144,158 to afford a home loan for a house and $87,478 for a unit. The city’s actual median household income is $137,760.

 

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This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

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Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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