7 Luxury Coffee Machines To Know
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7 Luxury Coffee Machines To Know

Whether you’re an amateur barista or just want caffeine on tap – here are some of the best coffee machines.

By Terry Christodoulou
Wed, Jul 14, 2021 11:04amGrey Clock 3 min

Working from home may mean that you’re missing your favourite cafe and that coffee pods just aren’t cutting it. With a newfound need for barista skills and the best equipment for the job, here are seven of the best and most beautiful coffee machines on the market.

Kees Van Der Westen – Speedster

The Speedster is a café favourite, often spotted racing coffees out the door of your favourite local. They’ve got this nifty number for the home complete with, shot timer, eco-mode for efficiency, two temperature-controlled boilers a large steam and coffee boiler capacity all made from high-grade stainless steel and stunning engine turned body panels.

$15,995; keesvanderwesten.com

 

Rocket Espresso – Porta Via

Coffee Machines

The Porta Via brings new meaning to ‘coffee to go’, the industrial quality coffee machine is built into a hard-wearing carry case making it a portable addition to your kitchen. At 29kg it comes with a lever-action group, pressure gauge and coffee boiler and is rapidly ready for a brew in 10 minutes.

 $4299; espressocompany.com.au

 

Jura – GIGA 6

For a ‘hands off’ coffee, it’s hard to look past the Jura Giga 6. The scope of the GIGA 6 is impressive, it boasts 28 different specialties, all at the press of its 4.3-inch high-res display.  It’s perfect for those who want everything automated, just load the twin hoppers with your beans of choice and select. Or better still, just order through the Jura App or tell Siri to make it for you.

$6490; jura.com

 

La Marzocco – Linea Mini

Coffee Machine

La Marzocco is the industry standard in café quality machines – with its history dating back almost 100 years to the streets of Florence. These fun little machines are perfect for home use with its simple controls, easy-to-read gauges, in-built temperature controller all bundled into a tidy package available in a range of bright colours.

$5990; lamarzocco.com

 

Gaggenau – 400 Series Coffee Machine

While all the coffee machines on this list try to be design-conscious, none are at the level of the built-in Gaggenau 400 Series. Its subtle design is coupled with tech that’s smart enough to remember eight specific orders and make near limitless combinations. The fully automatic, self-cleaning espresso machine allows for professional standard coffee, instantly and with minimal effort and with Gaggenau’s ‘home connect’ can literally take the process out of your hands.

$6999; gaggenau.com

 

Superveloce – Flat Six

You may have seen its Porsche inspired coffee machine doing the rounds, but beyond homages to German engineering, Superveloce makes a number of motoring and aeronautically inspired machines. Take the Flat-Six, with its Boxer Engine inspired stainless steel, titanium and alloy construction and carbon fibre cam cover. Just load it with your ground beans, or favourite capsule of choice and let the machine do the work.

Approx. $15,690; Superveloce.co

 

Slayer Espresso – Slayer Single Group

 

A coffee machine that shares the name of such an infamous heavy metal band is sure to have some guts about it.  Commercial-grade head, steam valves and brew actuator combine with a touchscreen interface to blur the lines between café and home use while the ash wood handles, and actuators and stainless-steel finishes give it a handsome look.

$13,500; slayerespresso.com



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Should AI Have Access to Your Medical Records? What if It Can Save Many Lives?

We asked readers: Is it worth giving up some potential privacy if the public benefit could be great? Here’s what they said.

By DEMETRIA GALLEGOS
Tue, May 28, 2024 4 min

We’re constantly told that one of the potentially biggest benefits of artificial intelligence is in the area of health. By collecting large amounts of data, AI can create all sorts of drugs for diseases that have been resistant to treatment.

But the price of that could be that we have to share more of our medical information. After all, researchers can’t collect large amounts of data if people aren’t willing to part with that data.

We wanted to see where our readers stand on the balance of privacy versus public-health gains as part of our series on ethical dilemmas created by the advent of AI.

Here are the questions we posed…

AI may be able to discover new medical treatments if it can scan large volumes of health records. Should our personal health records be made available for this purpose, if it has the potential to improve or save millions of lives? How would we guard privacy in that case?

…and some of the answers we received. undefined

Rely on nonpartisan overseers

While my own recent experience with a data breach highlights the importance of robust data security, I recognise the potential for AI to revolutionise healthcare. To ensure privacy, I would be more comfortable if an independent, nonpartisan body—overseen by medical professionals, data-security experts, and citizen representatives—managed a secure database.

Anonymity cuts both ways

Yes. Simply sanitise the health records of any identifying information, which is quite doable. Although there is an argument to be made that AI may discover something that an individual needs or wants to know.

Executive-level oversight

I think we can make AI scanning of health records available with strict privacy controls. Create an AI-CEO position at medical facilities with extreme vetting of that individual before hiring them.

Well worth it

This actually sounds like a very GOOD use of AI. There are several methods for anonymising data which would allow for studies over massive cross-sections of the population without compromising individuals’ privacy. The AI would just be doing the same things meta-studies do now, only faster and maybe better.

Human touch

My concern is that the next generations of doctors will rely more heavily, maybe exclusively, on AI and lose the ability or even the desire to respect the art of medicine which demands one-on-one interaction with a patient for discussion and examination (already a dying skill).

Postmortem

People should be able to sign over rights to their complete “anonymised” health record upon death just as they can sign over rights to their organs. Waiting for death for such access does temporarily slow down the pace of such research, but ultimately will make the research better. Data sets will be more complete, too. Before signing over such rights, however, a person would have to be fully informed on how their relatives’ privacy may also be affected.

Pay me or make it free for all

As long as this is open-source and free, they can use my records. I have a problem with people using my data to make a profit without compensation.

Privacy above all

As a free society, we value freedoms and privacy, often over greater utilitarian benefits that could come. AI does not get any greater right to infringe on that liberty than anything else does.

Opt-in only

You should be able to opt in and choose a plan that protects your privacy.

Privacy doesn’t exist anyway

If it is decided to extend human lives indefinitely, then by all means, scan all health records. As for privacy, there is no such thing. All databases, once established, will eventually, if not immediately, be accessed or hacked by both the good and bad guys.

The data’s already out there

I think it should be made available. We already sign our rights for information over to large insurance companies. Making health records in the aggregate available for helping AI spot potential ways to improve medical care makes sense to me.

Overarching benefit

Of course they should be made available. Privacy is no serious concern when the benefits are so huge for so many.

Compensation for breakthroughs

We should be given the choice to release our records and compensated if our particular genome creates a pathway to treatment and medications.

Too risky

I like the idea of improving healthcare by accessing health records. However, as great as that potential is, the risks outweigh it. Access to the information would not be controlled. Too many would see personal opportunity in it for personal gain.

Nothing personal

The personal info should never be available to anyone who is not specifically authorised by the patient to have it. Medical information can be used to deny people employment or licenses!

No guarantee, but go ahead

This should be allowed on an anonymous basis, without question. But how to provide that anonymity?

Anonymously isolating the information is probably easy, but that information probably contains enough information to identify you if someone had access to the data and was strongly motivated. So the answer lies in restricting access to the raw data to trusted individuals.

Take my records, please

As a person with multiple medical conditions taking 28 medications a day, I highly endorse the use of my records. It is an area where I have found AI particularly valuable. With no medical educational background, I find it very helpful when AI describes in layman’s terms both my conditions and medications. In one instance, while interpreting a CT scan, AI noted a growth on my kidney that looked suspiciously like cancer and had not been disclosed to me by any of the four doctors examining the chart.

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