Creative Ways To Display A Vinyl Record Collection
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Creative Ways To Display A Vinyl Record Collection

The beauty of LPs is their appeal is as auditory as it is visual.

By JENNIFER TZESES
Thu, Aug 5, 2021 12:56pmGrey Clock 4 min

Maybe you’ve been amassing a pile of vinyl since “Thriller” was released, or perhaps you’re continuing to add to an inherited stack handed down through generations—or maybe you’re new to the scene altogether.

The beauty of LPs is their appeal is as auditory as it is visual. “Vinyl records are to an audiophile what trophies are to an athlete: a symbol of passion,” says Amy Vroom owner of The Residency Bureau design studio in Seattle.

Part of the joy in having them is how they’re displayed. Here, ideas from the design pros to maximize your collection for your listening and viewing pleasure.

Curate the Experience 

“Displaying a record collection is an opportunity to create visual interest or a curated immersive experience. A shelf full of records alone is a study in texture, whether organized randomly or arranged by colour. An entire room can be transformed into a visual and auditory experience with a fluid temporal component as memories are triggered by navigating the soundtracks of time past.

“It is important to give the user the space and furnishings that facilitate lingering. Absorbing an entire LP is an opportunity for escape. The optimal record experience includes a cozy chair, a good sound system and room to rearrange the collection for a curated experience. Room should be considered for a small collection on heavy rotation in close proximity to the turntable and lounge chair(s).

“The most alluring presentation of a record collection includes a combination of albums displayed with cover art in view and the majority of the collection arranged side by side, inviting the viewer to dig deeper into the collection. Presenting records facing the viewer at counter-top height is a convenient way to allow users to thumb through a collection.”

Give It prominence

“A record display serves as a constant reminder of your love of music and sound. Any time I can design with my client’s interests in mind, I create more meaningful spaces for them. Finding subtle but imaginative ways to echo a passion for music is an amazing way to integrate vinyl and record players into a space without going over the top.

“One idea is to use a box-like shelf that has the width of a record and sufficient depth to store many albums at a time. You can flip through them like you would in a record shop. Then you can always swap out the first in the group as an ever-changing display. For one project, I selected a credenza with a pattern carved in wood that evokes the lines of a sound frequency. It’s something you might not notice consciously but creates an overall sense of cohesion.

“If someone is a true audiophile, the record player needs to be front and centre. It becomes the heart of the room—whether it’s a night in or a conversation point when entertaining. I always advise people not to put a record player behind closed doors if they want to listen to albums.

Designer Amy Vroom paired a record player and a credenza with a pattern evoking the lines of a sound frequency to create a sense of cohesion.
Sugar High Photography

— Amy Vroom owner of The Residency Bureau design studio in Seattle

Make It Part of the Décor

“You can learn so much about someone by their musical taste, so why not let that shine through in a home. A record display is another way of telling your story to family and friends, adding a very personal element to any room.

“Instead of covering the walls of your living room in art, try a display of record jackets that can rotate as your mood, preferences and décor changes. Many record jackets are quite beautiful, with quite a bit of creative effort put into making them. For a recent project, I installed thin, arrow ledge-like shelves on the walls to exhibit different album jackets. Each one is fun and colourful, and all together they make a bold impact.

“In addition to the main living room, a smaller library or office is a great place to spotlight a record collection. No matter where you put your record player and vinyls, find a beautiful cabinet with open shelves for records below and place the player on top.

“Elevating the equipment, as well as the record jackets, makes it feel special. For a recent project, instead of hiding stereo equipment in a cabinet, we put them on display. This client has a turntable that is so well crafted, it’s truly a work of art, and I am turning their former wet bar into a chic DJ booth.”.

— Phillip Thomas, founder and principal of Phillip Thomas Inc. in New York City

 

Let Guests Help Themselves

“Vinyl records add a cool factor to a room. For a pre-teen client, for example, we displayed her small collection on her dresser—we didn’t want this display to be too forced.

“Adding a record player in a living room console invites guests to pick a record and keep the party going. Keeping the record player accessible to guests means the music never gets stale. Vinyl has a sound of its own, and letting guests feel free to pick a song is a great way to set the tempo of the evening.

“The record player is a hot spot for entertaining; make sure your guests help themselves to your collection.”

Designer Lori Paranjape placed a record player atop a dresser in a pre-teen’s room to give it just the right amount of attitude.
Jared Kuzia Photography— Lori Paranjape, principal Mrs. Paranjape Design + Interiors in Nashville

 

 

Reprinted by permission of Mansion Global. Copyright 2021 Dow Jones & Company. Inc. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Original date of publication: August 4, 2021.



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Should AI Have Access to Your Medical Records? What if It Can Save Many Lives?

We asked readers: Is it worth giving up some potential privacy if the public benefit could be great? Here’s what they said.

By DEMETRIA GALLEGOS
Tue, May 28, 2024 4 min

We’re constantly told that one of the potentially biggest benefits of artificial intelligence is in the area of health. By collecting large amounts of data, AI can create all sorts of drugs for diseases that have been resistant to treatment.

But the price of that could be that we have to share more of our medical information. After all, researchers can’t collect large amounts of data if people aren’t willing to part with that data.

We wanted to see where our readers stand on the balance of privacy versus public-health gains as part of our series on ethical dilemmas created by the advent of AI.

Here are the questions we posed…

AI may be able to discover new medical treatments if it can scan large volumes of health records. Should our personal health records be made available for this purpose, if it has the potential to improve or save millions of lives? How would we guard privacy in that case?

…and some of the answers we received. undefined

Rely on nonpartisan overseers

While my own recent experience with a data breach highlights the importance of robust data security, I recognise the potential for AI to revolutionise healthcare. To ensure privacy, I would be more comfortable if an independent, nonpartisan body—overseen by medical professionals, data-security experts, and citizen representatives—managed a secure database.

Anonymity cuts both ways

Yes. Simply sanitise the health records of any identifying information, which is quite doable. Although there is an argument to be made that AI may discover something that an individual needs or wants to know.

Executive-level oversight

I think we can make AI scanning of health records available with strict privacy controls. Create an AI-CEO position at medical facilities with extreme vetting of that individual before hiring them.

Well worth it

This actually sounds like a very GOOD use of AI. There are several methods for anonymising data which would allow for studies over massive cross-sections of the population without compromising individuals’ privacy. The AI would just be doing the same things meta-studies do now, only faster and maybe better.

Human touch

My concern is that the next generations of doctors will rely more heavily, maybe exclusively, on AI and lose the ability or even the desire to respect the art of medicine which demands one-on-one interaction with a patient for discussion and examination (already a dying skill).

Postmortem

People should be able to sign over rights to their complete “anonymised” health record upon death just as they can sign over rights to their organs. Waiting for death for such access does temporarily slow down the pace of such research, but ultimately will make the research better. Data sets will be more complete, too. Before signing over such rights, however, a person would have to be fully informed on how their relatives’ privacy may also be affected.

Pay me or make it free for all

As long as this is open-source and free, they can use my records. I have a problem with people using my data to make a profit without compensation.

Privacy above all

As a free society, we value freedoms and privacy, often over greater utilitarian benefits that could come. AI does not get any greater right to infringe on that liberty than anything else does.

Opt-in only

You should be able to opt in and choose a plan that protects your privacy.

Privacy doesn’t exist anyway

If it is decided to extend human lives indefinitely, then by all means, scan all health records. As for privacy, there is no such thing. All databases, once established, will eventually, if not immediately, be accessed or hacked by both the good and bad guys.

The data’s already out there

I think it should be made available. We already sign our rights for information over to large insurance companies. Making health records in the aggregate available for helping AI spot potential ways to improve medical care makes sense to me.

Overarching benefit

Of course they should be made available. Privacy is no serious concern when the benefits are so huge for so many.

Compensation for breakthroughs

We should be given the choice to release our records and compensated if our particular genome creates a pathway to treatment and medications.

Too risky

I like the idea of improving healthcare by accessing health records. However, as great as that potential is, the risks outweigh it. Access to the information would not be controlled. Too many would see personal opportunity in it for personal gain.

Nothing personal

The personal info should never be available to anyone who is not specifically authorised by the patient to have it. Medical information can be used to deny people employment or licenses!

No guarantee, but go ahead

This should be allowed on an anonymous basis, without question. But how to provide that anonymity?

Anonymously isolating the information is probably easy, but that information probably contains enough information to identify you if someone had access to the data and was strongly motivated. So the answer lies in restricting access to the raw data to trusted individuals.

Take my records, please

As a person with multiple medical conditions taking 28 medications a day, I highly endorse the use of my records. It is an area where I have found AI particularly valuable. With no medical educational background, I find it very helpful when AI describes in layman’s terms both my conditions and medications. In one instance, while interpreting a CT scan, AI noted a growth on my kidney that looked suspiciously like cancer and had not been disclosed to me by any of the four doctors examining the chart.

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