Samsung Galaxy’s Foldable-Phone Pitch: Just Try Them
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Samsung Galaxy’s Foldable-Phone Pitch: Just Try Them

Company banks on more in-store visits and lower prices.

By JIYOUNG SOHN
Tue, Aug 17, 2021Grey Clock 4 min

SEOUL—Samsung Electronics Co. is betting the world is finally ready for its foldable phones.

Consumers had initially balked at a price tag that hovered around $2500. Durability remained a concern. Closed stores during the pandemic meant few buyers could see and touch a foldable phone that looks dramatically different from everything else.

That has brought an underwhelming debut to what had been one of the smartphone industry’s most-hyped products of late. The device has a tablet-size screen that folds in half like a book, becoming small enough to carry in a hand, pocket or purse. When closed, a second display on the outside can field most tasks.

Roh Tae-moon, president of Samsung’s mobile-communications business, said he has heard all the complaints. He is hopeful the company’s two new foldable devices, which were unveiled Wednesday, become more than fringe products in the smartphone market.

“We’ve seen that users who have tried foldable phones like the experience and say they want to use them again,” Mr. Roh said. “But it’s hard to discover the value of foldables if they haven’t had a chance to experience them.”

Samsung’s earlier foldable phone models, first introduced in 2019, weren’t sales hits, industry analysts say. Mr. Roh doesn’t see them as flops: He said they established baseline expectations among consumers and set the ground for this year’s models.

One immediate shift in tactics: a lower price tag. The larger Galaxy Z Fold 3 5G will cost $2499 less than its predecessor. The more compact Galaxy Z Flip 3 5G is priced at $1499.

The foldable phones were among devices unveiled at Samsung’s Wednesday event, which also featured two new versions of its Galaxy Watch—developed in partnership with Alphabet Inc.’s Google—and its Galaxy Buds 2 wireless earphones.

Samsung, the world’s largest smartphone maker by shipments, dominates the foldable category. Just three other companies have rival foldable phones: Huawei Technologies Co., Xiaomi Corp. and Lenovo Group Ltd.’s Motorola.

Two million foldable phones were sold world-wide last year, or about one-quarter of initial projections before the pandemic, according to Strategy Analytics, a market researcher. Shipments of foldable phones this year are forecast to hit seven million units, it said.

That is a sliver of the 1.42 billion smartphones forecast to be shipped in 2021, according to Strategy Analytics. But foldable phones have outsize importance, both as a flashy product that might sway consumers to upgrade their devices and as a profit driver.

If Samsung could sell 10 million foldable phones a year, it would likely generate $1 billion in operating profit—a sum that would be greater than the combined operating profit last year of the global smartphone industry that uses Google’s Android operating system, said Neil Mawston, executive director at Strategy Analytics.

Though Apple Inc.’s iPhone has seen sales soar, the broader smartphone industry could use a breakthrough hit. Worldwide shipments have declined the past three years, according to Strategy Analytics. Global phone shipments will grow 9% this year, though will be roughly the same size as in 2019, according to the company’s forecasts.

Foldable phones were more disproportionately affected by the pandemic than standard ones, industry analysts say. Given their novelty and higher price, foldable phones are products that consumers would prefer to hold in their hands before making the leap, and that became difficult during lockdowns, said Sanjeev Rana, a Seoul-based senior analyst at brokerage CLSA.

“Nobody wants to spend $2,000 looking at a phone on the internet,” Mr. Rana said.

Samsung’s mobile business has a lot riding on the foldable phones becoming a success. The Suwon, South Korea-based company doesn’t plan to release a new version of its plus-size Galaxy Note device this year. Pandemic-induced production issues in Vietnam affected output in recent months, while Covid-19 outbreaks in markets such as India sapped demand. Samsung’s second-quarter mobile profit fell 26% from the previous quarter.

Mr. Roh, 52 years old, has led Samsung’s mobile unit since early last year, after spending decades working in the company’s mobile research-and-development team. Market intelligence shows that people are using their mobile devices more than before the pandemic, he said, and using them to do more types of tasks.

The South Korean company’s foray into foldable phones in 2019 began with controversy. Tech reviewers found structural flaws, including screens that bulged. Samsung delayed the original Galaxy Fold phone by months and fortified the design.

Making the foldable phones sturdier is a selling point for Samsung’s two new releases. A protective film for the main display will improve durability by 80% compared with the previous models, the company says. The devices have gotten thinner and lighter, and come bolstered with stronger frames and hinges. Both are waterproof. Neither has an earphone jack.

The pricier Galaxy Z Fold 3 has a main display that measures 7.6 inches diagonally, with an exterior cover screen of 6.2 inches. When opened, the front-facing cameras are embedded under the display, meaning the circular lenses largely disappear when using the phone. It is compatible with the S Pen stylus, a favorite for Galaxy Note fans, though it must be purchased separately. Apps have been further optimized to provide a better fit on folded screens, Mr. Roh said.

The more compact Galaxy Z Flip 3 has a 6.7-inch main display. The area of the exterior screen, which had previously been a thin bar, is now large enough to support four main apps and enables users to read several lines of notifications and messages without opening the device.

Preorders for Samsung’s newest foldable devices begin Wednesday in the U.S., with the phones hitting shelves Aug. 27 in several markets. Samsung is letting consumers in the U.S. trade in up to four devices, including those from other brands, for discounts that could reduce the price of the Galaxy Z Fold 3 to $1,000 or halve the price of the Galaxy Z Flip 3.

Jene Park, a senior analyst at Counterpoint Research, which tracks smartphone sales, said Samsung’s foldable-phone pricing this year should be more aligned with what consumers expect.

Lee Ji-hoon, a 37-year-old office worker in Seoul, is an early adopter. Last year, he picked up a Galaxy Z Fold 2 and can’t see himself ever going back to a conventional smartphone. He is hooked on the wider screen.

But Mr. Lee acknowledges one drawback, even when the device is closed. “The phone is too bulky to fit in my pants pocket,” he said.

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When people talk about making a seachange, chances are this is the kind of property on the NSW South Coast that they have in mind.

Open for inspection for the first time this Saturday, 24 Point Street Bulli offers rare absolute beachfront, with never-to-be-built-out north facing views of the ocean. Located on the tip of Sandon Point, this two-storey property is a surfer’s dream with one of Australia’s most iconic surf breaks just beyond the back wall.

On the lower floor at street level, there are three bedrooms and two bathrooms, including a family bathroom and an ensuite in the master suite. A fourth bedroom is on the upper floor, along with the main living area, and is serviced by its own bathroom. 

While this would make a spectacular holiday home, it is well equipped for day-to-day living, with a spacious gourmet kitchen and butler’s pantry set into the articulated open plan living area on the first floor. A separate media room to the street side of the property on this level provides additional living space. 

Every aspect of this property has been considered to take in the light and views, with high ceilings internally and spacious, north facing decks on both levels to take in views of rolling waves. If the pull of the ocean is irresistible, it’s just a 100m walk to feel the sand between your toes.

The house is complemented by a Mediterranean, coastal-style garden, while the garage has room for a workshop and two car spaces.

An easy walk to Bulli village, the property is a 20 minute drive from the major hub of Wollongong and just over an hour to Sydney.

 

Open: Saturday August 6 2pm-3pm Auction: Saturday September 3 Price guide: N/A but expected to exceed $5.3m paid in March for 1 Alroy Street 

Contact: McGrath Thirroul – Vanessa Denison-Pender, 0488 443 174