Slight Fall For Sydney House Prices
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Slight Fall For Sydney House Prices

NSW capital on track to record first dip since September 2020.

By Terry Christodoulou
Wed, Feb 23, 2022 12:00pmGrey Clock < 1 min

Slight falls of over 0.2% over the past four months, undoing a small gain recorded in January amid a surge in listings and weakening demand from buyers according to CoreLogic data.

The 28-day rolling tally in the CoreLogic daily index shows Sydney prices slipped into negative territory on February 19 for the first time since October 2020.

With the month almost at an end, the NSW capital is on track to post its first monthly drop in prices since the market bottomed out in September 2020.

“It’s likely we will be reporting the first month-on-month decline in Sydney’s home value index since September 2020,” according to Tim Lawless, CoreLogic’s research director.

“It’s certainly not showing evidence that the market is crashing, it’s probably best described as a levelling out in price, similar to what we’re seeing in Melbourne.”

According to Mr Lawless, the weakening trend in prices is likely to continue as stock is pushed onto the market through to Easter.

“One of the best leading indicators – the comparative market analysis generated by real estate agents on CoreLogic’s RP Data portal when they prepare properties for sale – had risen by 23 per cent over the year and 45 per cent higher than 2020,” he said.

Melbourne too is showing signs of softening with CoreLogic’s daily index reading indicating no change over the past four weeks following a 0.2% price gain in January.

Perth is only recording 0.2% growth over the rolling four-week measures, while housing values continue to record higher gains in Brisbane and Adelaide — up 2.1% and 1.6% respectively over the 28 days ending February 22.



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Thousands of Australian companies on the brink of going into administration as EOFY nears

Along with high inflation and weak consumer spending, there’s another key factor pushing a record number of businesses to the edge

By Bronwyn Allen
Fri, Jun 21, 2024 3 min

More than 10,000 companies are expected to have entered external administration by the end of the 2024 financial year, a level not seen for more than a decade. Data just released by the Australian Securities & Investments Commission (ASIC) shows 1,245 companies became insolvent in May, the highest monthly number this financial year. At present, a total of 9,988 businesses have gone bust in FY24 with data from June yet to be finalised.

Deloitte Access Economics Partner David Rumbens said the surge in business insolvencies this year was a “clear sign of economic distress”.

He commented: “[ASIC] predicts that by the end of the financial year, the number of companies entering external administration will likely exceed 10,000 – a level not seen since 2012-13, in the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis (GFC).”

Mr Rumbens said the elements contributing to this year’s surge in insolvencies include high inflation and interest rates, weak consumer spending, and the commencement of more proactive tax debt collection activities by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

“One of the key factors contributing to this surge in insolvencies is the [ATO] pursuing debts that were previously put on hold during the COVID-19 pandemic,” he said.

Mr Rumbens cited ATO figures showing collectable debt rose 89 percent in the four years to June 2023. This has particularly impacted small businesses, which account for approximately 65 percent of the total debt owed at about $33 billion. “But more strictly enforced debt collection is coming at a time of tough economic conditions. High interest rates and cost-of-living pressures have weakened consumer spending, particularly in more discretionary components of spending.”

The construction sector has seen the highest number of insolvencies by far in FY24, mirroring the trend of FY23. Of the 9,988 insolvencies to date, 2,711 of them are in the building sector, which faces several challenges. These include a substantial lift in the cost of construction materials that is well above inflation and has made many fixed-price contracts signed within the past few years unprofitable. There is also a significant labour shortage that is delaying new home completions and new project starts, and also adding higher costs to projects.

“The construction sector has been hit particularly hard, with construction firms leading industry insolvencies in every quarter since mid-2021,” Mr Rumbens said. “They have accounted for approximately 25 percent of all insolvencies during this period. The residential construction sector is already facing a backlog of projects to complete as a result of skills and material shortages in recent years, and increased insolvencies in the sector may only exacerbate the problem of housing shortages.”

The ASIC data shows the next biggest industry affected is ‘other services’, which includes a broad range of personal care services such as hair, beauty, dietary, and death care services. The sector has seen 939 insolvencies in FY24. Retail trade is next with 687 insolvencies, followed by professional, scientific and technical services with 585 insolvencies.

“The food & accommodation sector has also experienced a wave of insolvencies. High input costs, worker shortages, and weak consumer sentiment have put pressure on businesses. Specifically, in March, cafés, restaurants, and takeaway businesses accounted for 5.5 percent of total business insolvencies, the highest proportion in the last three years.”

Mr Rumbens pointed out that while the number of insolvencies was high, it represents a lower share of the business sector at 0.33 percent than it did in FY13 when it was 0.53 percent. “This reflects the increase of registered companies in Australia, which has risen from just over two million to 3.3 million since 2012-13. Even so, the continued lift in insolvencies since 2021 highlights the difficult conditions many businesses face at present.”

 

 

MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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