The Secret to Mixing Pattern, Colour, Old and New
independent title
Kanebridge News
in commercial partnership with
Wall Street
Barrons
Mansion Global
Penta
Global insights from
  • Wall Street
  • Mansion Global
  • Barrons
">
    HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $1,451,814 (-0.59%)       Melbourne $954,733 (+0.50%)       Brisbane $706,830 (+2.69%)       Adelaide $649,510 (+1.37%)       Perth $582,081 (-0.52%)       Hobart $699,668 (-0.28%)       Darwin $636,930 (-0.88%)       Canberra $898,901 (-0.88%)       National $909,177 (-0.19%)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING PRICES AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $590,626 (-0.46%)       Melbourne $473,145 (-0.48%)       Brisbane $369,879 (-1.08%)       Adelaide $305,477 (+1.52%)       Perth $333,363 (-0.31%)       Hobart $487,440 (-6.89%)       Darwin $366,924 (-0.98%)       Canberra $397,038 (-7.49%)       National $434,380 (-2.60%)                HOUSES FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 9,125 (-508)       Melbourne 13,913 (-654)       Brisbane 8,220 (-594)       Adelaide 3,339 (+26)       Perth 11,136 (-136)       Hobart 437 (-7)       Darwin 240 (-6)       Canberra 672 (-20)       National 47,082 (-1,899)                UNITS FOR SALE AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 8,152 (-181)       Melbourne 8,696 (-136)       Brisbane 2,636 (-108)       Adelaide 847 (-27)       Perth 2,634 (+11)       Hobart 83 (-7)       Darwin 369 (-3)       Canberra 480 (+14)       National 23,897 (-437)                HOUSE MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $580 (+$10)       Melbourne $440 ($0)       Brisbane $480 (+$5)       Adelaide $450 ($0)       Perth $470 (+$20)       Hobart $540 (-$10)       Darwin $630 (-$10)       Canberra $675 (-$5)       National $546 ($0)                UNIT MEDIAN ASKING RENTS AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney $480 ($0)       Melbourne $360 (-$5)       Brisbane $440 ($0)       Adelaide $360 ($0)       Perth $410 (+$10)       Hobart $420 (+$30)       Darwin $500 (+$5)       Canberra $550 (+$3)       National $449 (+$4)                HOUSES FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 6,520 (+340)       Melbourne 9,842 (+219)       Brisbane 4,108 (+67)       Adelaide 1,114 (+31)       Perth 1,987 (+27)       Hobart 190 (+17)       Darwin 116 (+9)       Canberra 402 (+37)       National 24,279 (+747)                UNITS FOR RENT AND WEEKLY CHANGE     Sydney 17,331 (+299)       Melbourne 15,809 (-365)       Brisbane 3,104 (-53)       Adelaide 577 (-23)       Perth 988 (-28)       Hobart 77 (+5)       Darwin 273 (+14)       Canberra 495 (-21)       National 38,654 (-172)                HOUSE ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 2.08% (↑)        Melbourne 2.40% (↓)       Brisbane 3.53% (↓)       Adelaide 3.60% (↓)     Perth 4.20% (↑)        Hobart 4.01% (↓)       Darwin 5.14% (↓)     Canberra 3.90% (↑)      National 3.12% (↑)             UNIT ANNUAL GROSS YIELDS AND TREND       Sydney 4.23% (↑)        Melbourne 3.96% (↓)     Brisbane 6.19% (↑)        Adelaide 6.13% (↓)     Perth 6.40% (↑)      Hobart 4.48% (↑)      Darwin 7.09% (↑)      Canberra 7.20% (↑)      National 5.37% (↑)             HOUSE RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 1.7% (↑)      Melbourne 2.4% (↑)      Brisbane 1.0% (↑)      Adelaide 0.7% (↑)      Perth 1.0% (↑)      Hobart 0.9% (↑)      Darwin 0.9% (↑)      Canberra 0.7% (↑)      National 1.5% (↑)             UNIT RENTAL VACANCY RATES AND TREND       Sydney 3.7% (↑)      Melbourne 4.9% (↑)      Brisbane 2.0% (↑)      Adelaide 1.3% (↑)      Perth 1.4% (↑)      Hobart 1.7% (↑)      Darwin 1.0% (↑)      Canberra 1.5% (↑)      National 3.4% (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL HOUSES AND TREND       Sydney 25.0 (↑)      Melbourne 26.4 (↑)        Brisbane 31.0 (↓)       Adelaide 24.8 (↓)     Perth 41.2 (↑)        Hobart 20.1 (↓)       Darwin 36.6 (↓)     Canberra 18.7 (↑)      National 28.0 (↑)             AVERAGE DAYS TO SELL UNITS AND TREND       Sydney 26.4 (↑)      Melbourne 28.8 (↑)        Brisbane 35.0 (↓)     Adelaide 30.3 (↑)        Perth 44.6 (↓)     Hobart 21.7 (↑)      Darwin 41.0 (↑)      Canberra 28.5 (↑)      National 32.0 (↑)            
Share Button

The Secret to Mixing Pattern, Colour, Old and New

Here’s how the interior designer got it done.

By ELIZABETH QUINN BROWN
Mon, Oct 11, 2021Grey Clock 3 min

FORMAL BUT but whimsical, the dining room in Chris Barnes and Maisha Closson’s home in Los Angeles’s West Adams neighbourhood bursts with wildly disparate design references. How did local designer Dee Murphy, founder of Murphy Deesign, convince a wavy-fronted mahogany buffet to coexist with chairs as rigidly linear as Pierre Jeanneret’s 1950s designs; a live-edge dining table with an antique Turkish oushak rug? Shouldn’t the mix be as jarring as it sounds? Expert layering, said Ms. Murphy, comes of pairing hues, materials and shapes, not periods. “Anything that has history and has stood the test of time, those pieces you can always use no matter what,” she said.

The aesthetic glue that unifies the dining room’s seemingly random components begins with the choice of William Morris’s Strawberry Thief wallpaper. The Arts and Crafts pattern, from 1883, features rhythmic flourishes of flora and fauna in enthusiastic colours. Its rich blues and luscious pops of berry red led Ms. Murphy to choose pieces with companionable hues and forms. “When I look at this room, what’s really tying it in and calming it down is the paint, wallpaper, window treatments and rug. Those were the base pieces, the starting off points.”

Here, the other decisions that helped this obstreperous collection of elements cohere.

Botanical Engineering

Ms. Murphy admits she would normally set the finely detailed Indian chests against a less hectic, larger-scale wallpaper pattern. “But there was something about these chests and the black-and-white nature that felt neutral enough with a paper that’s just as busy,” she said. The camel-bone inlay, which depicts flat-petaled blossoms and spirals of climbing plants, also helps the little dressers jibe with the wall covering. Just as you can use a consistent palette to make a motley assortment of elements feel familial, she said, “you can use consistent themes to tie pieces in.” Scalloped-edge sconces from Nickey Kehoe allude to the red berries in the print, and the painting’s lyrical arches and colour palette similarly reinforce the motifs of the paper.

Dissonance and Harmony

The brass base of the walnut-wood dining table has been fashioned into a butterfly, or wishbone, shape. “It’s about a contrast, right? And a tension,” explained the designer. “The table slab has a more masculine feel because it’s big, it’s heavy, it’s wood. Then, you have the curves of the legs supporting it, and that’s more feminine.” An industrial or hefty base would have been much more predictable and created a cluster of angled legs. The modernist chairs and boho mirrors, meanwhile, respectively masculine and feminine, resolve their tension via matching organic materials: cane and wicker. “It’s very subtle, but it’s something that a discerning eye can pick out,” said Ms. Murphy. “There’s a reason why it feels fluid.”

Curve Balls and Line Drives

Interior designer Dee Murphy carefully weighed the formal qualities of the furnishings she included in the dining room of this home in the West Adams neighbourhood of Los Angeles. “Most rooms are square or rectangular, so you want to offset that and put some beautiful, curvy movement into the room,” she said. The undulating wallpaper pattern, the bow-front Federal-style sideboard, the looping wicker mirror frames, all contribute roundness. At the same time, angles and lines are needed to create dissonance. The sharply edged chairs were an inspired addition to the heart of the dining room, as was the slender, horizontal contemporary chandelier. Of her decision to hang a series of three petite mirrors from France she explained that repeating a single object allows you to make a statement but stops short of being garish. “If I had tried to add in a vintage, French, gilt gold mirror, that would have taken that moment a little too over the top.”

MOST POPULAR

Melbourne’s prestige market has had an exceptional year.

An influx of people could calm future volatility.

advertisement
Related Stories
Lifestyle
By Terry Christodoulou 01/12/2021
Lifestyle
By Terry Christodoulou 29/11/2021
Lifestyle
By Alexandra Samuel 29/11/2021
advertisement