The 5 Worst Interior Design Mistakes, According To An Expert
Kanebridge News
Share Button

The 5 Worst Interior Design Mistakes, According To An Expert

Interior designer Thomas Hamel on where it goes wrong in so many homes.

By Thomas Hamel
Thu, Jun 23, 2022 6:00amGrey Clock 3 min

Specialising in residential design, Thomas Hamel and his eponymous design firm, Thomas Hamel & Associates, has built a heady reputation for blending elements of design to create timeless interiors for modern living.

We recently asked Hamel, what are the biggest design mistakes that you want to avoid when decorating or updating interiors.

Here – 5 mistakes to avoid and rules to live by:

1. Don’t ignore the interior architecture

Some houses or rooms have what we call “good bones”. Others, however, do not, and that is when it is important, rather than diving straight in to the fabrics and furnishings, for the interior architecture to be considered as a priority, to give a room a better sense of presence. Heights of door frames can be “tweaked” through window treatments and mouldings/panelling to add scale and “wow” factor to a room. Rooms can be opened up to adjoining rooms or to an outdoor area, doorways enlarged for greater flow, and mouldings and panelling incorporated to give a room more presence. These fairly easy design touches can give a room “good bones” and often without a huge cost outlay. It is a good idea to have your interior designer work in tandem with the architect, as well as the landscape designer in advance of embarking on the more decorative aspect of the project.

2. Never overlook the importance of area rugs 

At Thomas Hamel & Associates, we prioritise a room’s rugs before moving on to select the fabrics, lighting or decorative pieces. A rug truly anchors a room and informs the overall feel and aesthetic. This important starting point leads to our choices of fabrics, furnishings, and paint colours. The rug is the first port of call. It is essential to choose the correct rug sizing, as this is closely linked to the proportions of the furniture pieces and light fixtures. We often custom design rugs for our clients, with the help of specialist rug dealers like Behruz in Melbourne.

3. Don’t Match Everything

It is important to avoid the ‘everything has to match’ syndrome. No great room ever felt or looked ‘cookie cutter’! We prefer to combine a variety of different styles. Clients may live in a contemporary house, but if they fall in love with an antique piece of furniture or traditional work of art, we say “go for it”. Integrating a range of periods and styles tells the story of who lives there and adds personality to a house. No one wants to live in a design showroom, and nor should they.

4. Not considering your location 

The best homes/rooms have a true “ sense of place”, so consider your location before embarking on a design scheme. While Tuscan houses look great in the Italian countryside, they are not so appropriate in Queensland. Likewise, it’s best to leave the “ Hamptons style” in Long Island, rather than trying to recreate it in urban Melbourne, A home should be true to its setting. In Australia, that may mean making the most of our warm climate by incorporating opportunities for indoor/outdoor living. Or in Sydney, playing to the view if you are lucky enough to live on the harbour. In Melbourne, it may be a garden that forms the focus of a room’s outlook.

5. Always allow space for art and objects

Memorable rooms are often filled with an owner’s favourite objects, collected over time from travels, a gallery visit, or perhaps passed down through families over generations. Avoid the notion and temptation that everything for your interior should be bought at once, or feel that the house is “done” when the interior design scheme is completed. Collecting is fun and the stories that objects and art tell about the owner are what makes a house truly special.

thomashamel.com

MOST POPULAR

Chris Dixon, a partner who led the charge, says he has a ‘very long-term horizon’

Americans now think they need at least $1.25 million for retirement, a 20% increase from a year ago, according to a survey by Northwestern Mutual

Related Stories
Lifestyle
Pantone’s colour for 2023 signals confidence and optimism
By Robyn Willis 03/12/2022
Lifestyle
WHY THE RENOVATOR’S DELIGHT HAS DONE ITS DASH
By Kirsten Craze 02/12/2022
Lifestyle
Sam Bankman-Fried Denies Knowing Scale of Bad Alameda Bets
By ALEXANDER SAEEDY 02/12/2022
Pantone’s colour for 2023 signals confidence and optimism

Be prepared to see this shade of stunning red everywhere next year

By Robyn Willis
Sat, Dec 3, 2022 < 1 min

Paint company and international arbiters of colour, Pantone, have announced the 2023 Colour of the Year – and it’s a sumptuous shade of red.

The deep hue, Viva Magenta is a bold choice, designed to challenge and invigorate as the world powers out of almost three years of uncertainty and anxiety.

Describing it as ‘a new vision’, Pantone’s Twitter account said Viva Magenta was “vibrating with vim and vigour, a shade rooted in nature descending from the red family demonstrating a new signal of strength”.

It’s a dramatic departure from the choice for 2022, Veri Peri, a mix of lavender and blue, reflecting a desire for reassurance.

Instead, Viva Magenta, which has both warm and cool tones, represents “a brave and fearless carmine red imbued with dynamic presence, invigorating experimentation, and an emboldened desire for self-expression”. 

The Colour of the Year is a colour forecast and can influence everything from fashion and homewares to cake decorating and hair colours.

MOST POPULAR
5 Luxury Brisbane Apartments

Inside the Queensland capital’s most elevated residences.

Tom Cruise

The actor’s Telluride property is as action-packed as his films.

0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop