The NSW country estate to rival Elizabeth Bennet's family home
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The NSW country estate to rival Elizabeth Bennet’s family home

The perfect property awaits when Mr Darcy comes to call

By KANEBRIDGE NEWS
Thu, Jul 13, 2023 7:00amGrey Clock 2 min

Bowled over by Bridgerton? Delighted by Downtown Abbey? Or still pining for Pride and Prejudice?

If you’ve always dreamed of living in a bygone era where formal introductions were de rigueur and ladies danced with gentlemen at country balls, chances are opportunities have been scarce. The number of well-maintained historic country estates still standing in Australia is low and even fewer come onto the property market. Which makes the sale of 4 Ranelagh Road, Burradoo all the more special.

Set on 4.54ha in the NSW Southern Highlands, Knoyle Estate was designed by London architect Maurice Adams and built in the 1880s as a country retreat for Charles B Fairfax and his wife Florence.

Offering one of the largest landholdings and oldest gardens in the area, the property has four residences, all self contained. The main house has 1155sqm internal space with 14 bedrooms, seven bathrooms and five living spaces. The other three residences are of varying sizes, with one offering eight bedrooms, another five bedrooms and the smallest with four bedrooms.The park-like gardens include rare specimens and century-old trees as well as a seven-level private labyrinth.

While it is indeed perfect for stepping back in time, the property has been put to various uses over the years, including as a boarding school. Agent Andrew Blake from Knight Frank notes that it sits on three titles, with the possibility of subdivision and dual occupancy.

 “The property could be used in its current form as a grand home, but there is also the opportunity to repurpose the residence, as well as to develop, subject to council approval and hence for it to instead be a commercial acquisition,” he said. 

“Other possible uses include a bed and breakfast or a country hotel with the demand for premium accommodation in the area, a luxury wellness retreat, a wedding or events venue, a cooking school, an art gallery or even as a retail outlet for antique dealers. 

“There is also the potential for group homes and seniors’ living.”

A stunning property in the Queen Anne style with Arts and Crafts and Gothic Revival influences, it’s the stuff dreams are made of.

 

Address: 4 Ranelagh Road, Burradoo 

Price guide: $12 million

Agents: Nathan Berlyn Nathan.berlyn@au.knightfrank.com 0449 157 773.

Andrew Blake Andrew.blake@au.knightfrank.com 0434 770 307

Inspection: By appointment

 



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Anger Does a Lot More Damage to Your Body Than You Realise

We all get mad now and then. But too much anger can cause problems.

By SUMATHI REDDY
Fri, May 24, 2024 3 min

Anger is bad for your health in more ways than you think.

Getting angry doesn’t just hurt our mental health , it’s also damaging to our hearts, brains and gastrointestinal systems, according to doctors and recent research. Of course, it’s a normal emotion that everyone feels—few of us stay serene when a driver cuts us off or a boss makes us stay late. But getting mad too often or for too long can cause problems.

There are ways to keep your anger from doing too much damage. Techniques like meditation can help, as can learning to express your anger in healthier ways.

One recent study looked at anger’s effects on the heart. It found that anger can raise the risk of heart attacks because it impairs the functioning of blood vessels, according to a May study in the Journal of the American Heart Association .

Researchers examined the impact of three different emotions on the heart: anger, anxiety and sadness. One participant group did a task that made them angry, another did a task that made them anxious, while a third did an exercise designed to induce sadness.

The scientists then tested the functioning of the blood vessels in each participant, using a blood pressure cuff to squeeze and release the blood flow in the arm. Those in the angry group had worse blood flow than those in the others; their blood vessels didn’t dilate as much.

“We speculate over time if you’re getting these chronic insults to your arteries because you get angry a lot, that will leave you at risk for having heart disease ,” says Dr. Daichi Shimbo, a professor of medicine at Columbia University and lead author of the study.

Your gastrointestinal system

Doctors are also gaining a better understanding of how anger affects your GI system.

When someone becomes angry, the body produces numerous proteins and hormones that increase inflammation in the body. Chronic inflammation can raise your risk of many diseases.

The body’s sympathetic nervous system—or “fight or flight” system—is also activated, which shunts blood away from the gut to major muscles, says Stephen Lupe, director of behavioural medicine at the Cleveland Clinic’s department of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition. This slows down movement in the GI tract, which can lead to problems like constipation.

In addition, the space in between cells in the lining of the intestines opens up, which allows more food and waste to go in those gaps, creating more inflammation that can fuel symptoms such as stomach pain, bloating or constipation.

Your brain

Anger can harm our cognitive functioning, says Joyce Tam, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. It involves the nerve cells in the prefrontal cortex, the front area of our brain that can affect attention, cognitive control and our ability to regulate emotions.

Anger can trigger the body to release stress hormones into the bloodstream. High levels of stress hormones can damage nerve cells in the brain’s prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, says Tam.

Damage in the prefrontal cortex can affect decision-making, attention and executive function, she adds.

The hippocampus, meanwhile, is the main part of the brain used in memory. So when neurons are damaged, that can disrupt the ability to learn and retain information, says Tam.

What you can do about it

First, figure out if you’re angry too much or too often. There’s no hard and fast rule. But you may have cause for concern if you’re angry for more days than not, or for large portions of the day, says Antonia Seligowski, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, who studies the brain-heart connection.

Getting mad briefly is different than experiencing chronic anger, she says.

“If you have an angry conversation every now and again or you get upset every now and again, that’s within the normal human experience,” she says. “When a negative emotion is prolonged, when you’re really having a lot more of it and maybe more intensely, that’s where it’s bad for your health.”

Try mental-health exercises. Her group is looking at whether mental-health treatments, like certain types of talk therapy or breathing exercises, may also be able to improve some of the physical problems caused by anger.

Other doctors recommend anger-management strategies. Hypnosis, meditation and mindfulness can help, says the Cleveland Clinic’s Lupe. So too can changing the way you respond to anger.

Slow down your reactions. Try to notice how you feel and slow down your response, and then learn to express it. You also want to make sure you’re not suppressing the feeling, as that can backfire and exacerbate the emotion.

Instead of yelling at a family member when you’re angry or slamming something down, say, “I am angry because X, Y and Z, and therefore I don’t feel like eating with you or I need a hug or support,” suggests Lupe.

“Slow the process down,” he says.

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This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

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Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

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