The stay-at-home generation: More young Australians are living with their parents for longer
Kanebridge News
Share Button

The stay-at-home generation: More young Australians are living with their parents for longer

Housing affordability, higher rates of tertiary study and delayed marriage are likely drivers

By Bronwyn Allen
Tue, Feb 27, 2024 11:11amGrey Clock 2 min

A rising number of young Australians are remaining in the family home after finishing school, as economic and social factors drive them to delay independent living, according to new research. And they’re staying longer, with a marked increase in 20-somethings still living at home over the past two decades.

Just over 54 percent of young men and 47 percent of young women aged between 18 and 29 years are still living in the family home, according to the 18th annual report for the longitudinal Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey. The survey tracks the lives of 17,000 Australians and reports each year on various aspects of life, including health and education, household and family relationships, and income and work. The latest HILDA data was collected in 2021 during the pandemic.

HILDA Survey Co-Director, Professor Roger Wilkins from Melbourne University, said the trend of more young people remaining in the family home began in the early 2000s. He attributes it to a variety of social and economic elements.

“We’ve seen a rise in higher education participation, declining full-time employment opportunities for young people, a rising cost in housing, and a trend towards later marriage and family formation,” he said.

Over the past 20 years, the prevalence of young people living with their parents has been highest among those aged 18 to 21 years, which is unsurprising given these are the first few years of post-school adulthood when many young people are studying and unable to work full time. However, the data also shows that young people are living with mum and dad for longer periods — and well into their 20s.

Among 18 to 29-year-olds, the age category that has seen the most growth in young men living at home is 22 to 25 years. It’s up 12 percent from 42.1 percent in 2001 to 54.1 percent in 2021. Among women, the age category with the highest growth is 18 to 21 years, up 17.6 percent from 61.9 percent in 2001 to 79.5 percent in 2021. The age category with the second highest growth rate for both men and women is 26 to 29 years, up 9.9 percent for men and 11.6 percent for women since 2001.

Professor of Sociology and Social Policy at Melbourne University, Lyn Craig, said the trend has broad macroeconomic implications for Australia. “Since the mid-20-teens, fertility has fallen below replacement in Australia for the first time and I think that has something to do with the price of housing and young people not being able to afford to establish an independent household away from parents,” she said.

During the early 2000s when this trend began, the Australian housing market was in a boom and buying was difficult for young people to afford. Today, simply renting has become hard to afford, particularly following a 40 percent surge in rents nationally since the pandemic began.

While some young people are constrained by economic factors, others are likely delaying independence by choice, Professor Wilkins said.

“Some young people would like to start their adulthood journey and to have their own home but Australia’s economic conditions aren’t allowing that. On the positive side, as a richer society with longer life expectancy, perhaps some young people are making a rational and conscious choice to delay getting into the hard yakka of life. They decide to enjoy themselves and have some fun while they are still young.”

 



MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Money
The Top 10 highest paid CEOs of the ASX 200 revealed
By Bronwyn Allen 23/07/2024
Money
Is ‘Rizz’ the Secret to Getting Ahead at Work?
By RACHEL FEINTZEIG 23/07/2024
Money
Where Do Economists Think We’re Headed? These Are Their Predictions
By SAM GOLDFARB 23/07/2024
Winning neighbourhoods where home values rose most in FY24

We reveal the No. 1 areas for price growth in each capital city

By Bronwyn Allen
Thu, Jul 18, 2024 3 min

Home values across Australia rose by a median 8 percent in FY24, delivering the equivalent of $59,000 in new capital growth to the two-thirds of the population that owns a home, according to CoreLogic data. Investors received total returns of 12.2 percent over the year, including capital gains and gross rental income.

Very tight supply and demand in most capital cities except Melbourne and Hobart was a significant driver of the capital growth, with the smaller and more affordable capital cities of Perth, Brisbane and Adelaide experiencing the most price appreciation over the year. A lack of properties for sale trumped the usual dampening effect of higher interest rates.

As usual, some areas outperformed their city’s median growth benchmark. Here are the top SA3 areas for capital growth in each capital city of Australia in FY24. SA3 areas are large suburbs, or districts incorporating clusters of suburbs, with more than 20,000 residents.

 

Sydney

Home values across Sydney rose by a median 6.3 percent in FY24. The No. 1 area for growth was Mount Druitt. Its median value rose by 13.96 percent to $859,939. Mount Druitt is located 33km west of the CBD. It incorporates the suburbs of Mount Druitt, Ropes Crossing, Whalan and Minchinbury. The Mount Druitt community is very multicultural with almost one in two residents born overseas. It is home to many young families, with the median age of residents being 33 compared to the NSW median of 39.

 

Melbourne

Home values across Melbourne rose by a median 1.3 percent in FY24. The top area for capital growth was Moreland-North with 4.71 percent growth. This took the district’s median home value to $746,488. Moreland-North includes the suburbs of Hadfield, Pascoe Vale and Glenroy. It’s a multicultural community with a particularly large contingent of residents with Italian ancestry. One or both parents of 66 percent of residents were born overseas, according to the 2021 Census.

 

Brisbane

Home values across Brisbane rose by a median 15.8 percent in FY24. The No. 1 area for growth was Springwood-Kingston in Logan City. Its median value swelled by 25.55 percent to $710,569. Springwood-Kingston is approximately 22km south of Brisbane CBD. It incorporates the suburbs of Springwood, Kingston, Rochedale South and Slacks Creek. It is a multicultural community with one or both parents of 55 percent of the residents born overseas, according to the 2021 Census. More than 15 percent of residents have Irish or Scottish ancestry.

 

Adelaide

Home values across Adelaide rose by a median 15.4 percent in FY24. The best area for capital growth was Playford in Playford City. Its median value soared by 19.94 percent to $530,991. Playford is approximately 40km north of Adelaide. It incorporates the suburbs of Elizabeth Downs, Elizabeth Grove, Angle Vale and Virginia. It is home to many young people under the age of 40. The median age of residents is 33 compared to the state median of 41.

 

Perth 

Home values across Perth rose by a median 23.6 percent in FY24. The No. 1 area for growth was Kwinana in Kwinana City. Its median value skyrocketed by 33.19 percent to $618,925. Kwinana is approximately 37km south of Perth CBD. It includes the suburbs of Leda, Medina, Casuarina and Mandogalup. Henderson Naval Base is located here and there is a significant community of servicemen and ex-servicemen living in the area. It is home to many young families, with the median age of residents being 33 compared to the state median of 38.

 

Canberra

Home values across the nation’s capital rose by a median 2.2 percent in FY24. The best area for capital growth was Weston Creek. Its median value rose by 5.24 percent to $937,740. Weston Creek is approximately 13km south-west of the CBD. It includes the suburbs of Weston Creek, Holder, Duffy, Fisher and Chapman. Approximately 43 percent of residents have a bachelor’s degree, which is on par with the ACT median but much higher than the national median of 26 percent. Household incomes are about 35 percent higher than the national median. Almost one in five residents work in government administration jobs.

 

Hobart

Home values across Hobart fell 0.1 percent in FY24. The top performing area for capital gains was Sorell-Dodges Ferry with 2.78 percent growth. This took the area’s median home value to $615,973. Sorell-Dodges Ferry is approximately 25km north-west of Hobart. It incorporates the suburbs of Richmond, Sorell, Dodges Ferry, Carlton and Primrose Sands. The area has a large community of baby boomers and retirees, with the median age of residents being 43 compared to the Australian median of 38.

 

Darwin

Home values across Darwin rose by a median 2.4 percent in FY24. The No. 1 area for growth was Litchfield. Its median value moved 3.21 higher to $672,003. Litchfield is about 37km south-east of Darwin and includes the suburbs of Humpty Doo, Acacia Hills and Southport.  It has a high proportion of middle-aged residents, with the median age being 39 compared to the territory median of 33. About 12 percent of residents are Indigenous Australians. The biggest industries are government administration and defence. Median household incomes are about 35 percent higher than the national median.

 

MOST POPULAR
11 ACRES ROAD, KELLYVILLE, NSW

This stylish family home combines a classic palette and finishes with a flexible floorplan

35 North Street Windsor

Just 55 minutes from Sydney, make this your creative getaway located in the majestic Hawkesbury region.

Related Stories
Lifestyle
Celebrations Big and Small Are Getting Longer and More Extravagant for the Rich
By SHIVANI VORA 21/06/2024
Money
Monaco, Venezuela Placed on Global Money-Laundering Watch List
By MENGQI SUN 02/07/2024
Money
The Money Habits I Learned From My Parents—for Better or Worse
By JESSICA CHOU 16/06/2024
0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop