The Surprising Way Nike CEO John Donahoe Starts His Day
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The Surprising Way Nike CEO John Donahoe Starts His Day

Including a litre of water. a workout and a burgeoning gratitude practice.

By LANE FLORSHEIM
Wed, Sep 8, 2021 11:10amGrey Clock 6 min

Early in his career, Nike President and CEO John Donahoe heard a speaker at a Bain & Company training program make an observation that immediately clicked with him: Elite athletes tend to view getting help as a sign of strength. “He was talking about [how] Michael Jordan didn’t only have Phil Jackson as his bench coach, but he had a personal chef; he had a psychological coach,” says Donahoe, 61. “And he said, ‘You people in business, you act like getting help is a sign of weakness. You act like you have all the answers. If you want to perform at a world-class level, you’ve got to feel comfortable consuming help.’ ” In the decades since, Donahoe has worked with multiple leadership coaches; seen his therapist, Jill Mellick, for 30 years; and established his own board of personal directors—trusted friends he turns to for advice.

Donahoe, who was born in Evanston, Illinois, is both a father of four with his wife, Eileen, and a four-time CEO, having led Bain & Company, eBay and the digital workflow company ServiceNow. In January 2020, after having been on Nike’s board of directors since 2014, he moved to Oregon when he became the company’s fourth chief executive, following co-founder Phil Knight, William Perez and Mark Parker.

Since taking Nike’s top job, Donahoe has had his work cut out for him. Before he became CEO, there had been negative reports in the media on Nike’s treatment of female employees and female athlete partners. Donahoe has set a target of filling 45 percent of roles at the vice president level and higher with women by 2025. He also aims to have 30 percent representation of racial and ethnic minorities at the director level and above in Nike’s U.S. workforce. He had planned to go on a 100-day global “listening tour” that, due to the pandemic, he had to complete virtually. This past week, Nike closed its corporate offices around the world to give employees time off to rest and recharge.

“In many ways, Nike’s viewed as a real leader in advocating for diversity externally,” he says. “We want to make sure we’re also a leader internally.”

What time do you usually wake up on Mondays?

I’m a creature of habit. I wake up at 5:45 every weekday morning. The first thing I do is drink 33 ounces (approx. 1-litre) of water and two cups of coffee, and then I stretch using the Hyperice Hypervolt [a massage recovery device]. I meditate for 10 minutes and then I have a Nike personal trainer—his name’s JC Cook. I work out from 7 to 8, four mornings a week with him.

What day do you take off?

That varies. I have learned a lot from a guy we have at Nike, Ryan Flaherty, who is an elite trainer and has looked at the data about what elite athletes do. And he talks about the five facets of sport, which are movement, sleep, nutrition, mindset and recovery, recovery being really important. So we just kind of gauge how my body’s feeling any given week, or sometimes I have early meetings—that tends to dictate it too.

How many hours of sleep do you get per night?

I’ve accepted that I need sleep. Earlier in my career, I told myself I don’t really need that much sleep. And the reality is sleep’s really important. And so I target getting seven-plus hours a night. Sometimes that’s unrealistic, so I target getting 70 hours every 10 days.

What do you eat for breakfast to start the week off right?

I have a protein shake, and then once I get to the office I’ll have a Chobani yogurt and a banana.

Is there a time of day or the week that you’re most creative?

The morning would be my best time. There are some mornings where I’ll stay home for the first couple of hours with no meetings, either to reflect or to collect my thoughts or if I have to write something. On a Monday morning, you have to have a plan for the week, so usually on Sunday, I’ll sit down and look at my week and try to just for a few moments reflect on what are the most important things I want to get done for the week. I’ve learned over my career to be more conscious of where are the moments I’m going to prepare for things, and schedule those in, legitimize those things—including the times I want to be creative.

When you’re reflecting, what does that look like for you?

I took a year off, a sabbatical so to speak, in 2015, and I did a 10-day silent Buddhist retreat up at Spirit Rock [a meditation centre in Woodacre, California] with [author and Buddhist practitioner] Jack Kornfield. Jack’s been a wonderful spiritual counsellor and adviser. What I’ve been doing a lot lately is gratitude practice. What we know from brain sciences and Buddhism teachings is you can, in fact, train your brain. Your brain becomes more negative over time because negative experiences stick in our brains. So you can counteract that by being more conscious of things you’re appreciative of, of the good things in your life. And so I just think, What am I grateful for in the broad sense of my life? What am I grateful for in the previous day? What am I looking forward to that I’m going to enjoy in the coming day? It’s a good exercise. For so many years, I was very diligent about physical working out. But what I’ve learned in my sort of later years, the last five to 10, is the importance of what you might call a workout of the mind. It’s that notion of mindfulness, and it needs the same kind of discipline and focus that the physical side needs.

What changes have you made as Nike CEO so far?

Digital is infusing every element of our consumers’ lives. So whether it’s a Nike Training Club, Nike Run Club, our activity apps or the SNKRS app or the Nike mobile app, consumers have led us to that and we’ve tried to make sure we’re right there with them in all aspects of their lives.

Do you have a guiding philosophy?

I’m an advocate of servant leadership. When I understand that everything I’m doing is in service to a purpose, in service to others, I have a wellspring of motivation and inspiration even through periods of adversity. Just staying connected with this notion of, we’re on earth to serve others. My leadership role models have always been head coaches—you think about Phil Jackson, Coach K [Mike Krzyzewski], John Thompson, Tara [VanDerveer], who just won the NCAA [women’s basketball] championship—they’re leaders that lead from almost behind, serving their players, serving their programs, serving a broader cause. The power of service has been a recurring lesson throughout my life, my career.

What lessons did you learn about running a company during the pandemic?

I think change and uncertainty are the new normal…so just accepting and then dealing with continuous change and uncertainty. Second, the importance of being really clear on your values, because you need a rudder. At Nike, early on in the pandemic, we reflected on our values, and that’s what drove our decision to provide pay continuity to all of our store athletes [retail employees]. Even in the months when all of our stores were closed, it was a no-brainer for us. It was an investment of [around] $500 million, but it was absolutely the right thing to do. The third thing is the importance of communication and transparency. While leading a Zoom life is taxing in many ways, what Zoom has been able to do is, I’m in front of 25,000 people once a month on Zoom. And then the last thing it’s reinforced for me as a leader is the power of authenticity and vulnerability, because I don’t have the answers many times, whether it’s around the pandemic or racial and social injustice issues or geopolitical issues. But I think there’s a real power and a real need to just show up and be authentic, be vulnerable and be present.

How does Nike think about appealing to a Gen Z audience?

We talk about our consumer muse being the young person who’s 16 to 24 years old. This generation, they want their individuality. They want to be understood and respected for who they are, and that can vary across race, gender, point of view, background. They don’t want to be labelled, and yet they also want to be part of a community. They want diversity, equity and inclusiveness; they want that to be their world. It’s such an interesting time to both try to understand the unique qualities of each individual but have that not be divisive, have that be community building…. I come away with a great deal of hope when we listen to Gen Z because they’re stepping up in ways where they’ll be responsible leaders of this world in the next 10, 20, 30, 40 years.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

5 Monday Must-Haves
Hyperice Hypervolt

“Every morning, I stretch using the Hyperice for 20 minutes.”

Insight Timer

“I have an app on my phone…even commuting into work, I’ll just do gratitude practice, which in this moment in time is a really helpful and useful thing.”

Nike Space Hippie Shoes

“The Space Hippie takes trash (literally!) and transforms it into a great shoe with a unique aesthetic.”

Vitamins

“A multivitamin, vitamin B, vitamin D or curcumin…. I almost don’t even know what’s in the handful of things I take; I’m willing to try anything.”

HO

“A Monday morning, it’s not that different than many others: Start with 33 ounces of water.”

 

Reprinted by permission of The Wall Street Journal, Copyright 2021 Dow Jones & Company. Inc. All Rights Reserved Worldwide. Original date of publication: August 30, 2021.



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A Killer Golf Swing Is a Hot Job Skill Now

Companies are eager to hire strong players who use hybrid work schedules to schmooze clients on the course

By CALLUM BORCHERS
Fri, Jun 14, 2024 5 min

Standout golfers who aren’t quite PGA Tour material now have somewhere else to play professionally: Corporate America.

People who can smash 300-yard drives and sink birdie putts are sought-after hires in finance, consulting, sales and other industries, recruiters say. In the hybrid work era, the business golf outing is back in a big way.

Executive recruiter Shawn Cole says he gets so many requests to find ace golfers that he records candidates’ handicaps, an index based on average number of strokes over par, in the information packets he submits to clients. Golf alone can’t get you a plum job, he says—but not playing could cost you one.

“I know a guy that literally flies around the world in a private jet loaded with French wine, and he golfs and lands hundred-million-dollar deals,” Cole says.

Tee times and networking sessions have long gone hand-in-golf-glove. Despite criticism that doing business on the course undermines diversity, equity and inclusion efforts—and the fact that golf clubs haven’t always been open to women and minorities —people who mix golf and work say the outings are one of the last reprieves from 30-minute calendar blocks

Stars like Tiger Woods and Michelle Wie West helped expand participation in the sport. Still, just 22% of golfers are nonwhite and 26% are women, according to the National Golf Foundation.

To lure more people, clubs have relaxed rules against mobile-phone use on the course, embracing white-collar professionals who want to entertain clients on the links without disconnecting from the office. It’s no longer taboo to check email from your cart or take a quick call at the halfway turn.

With so much other business conducted virtually, shaking hands on the green and schmoozing over clubhouse beers is now seen as making an extra effort, not slacking off.

Americans played a record 531 million rounds last year. Weekday play has nearly doubled since 2019, with much of the action during business hours , according to research by Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom .

“It would’ve been scandalous in 2019 to be having multiple meetings a week on the golf course,” Bloom says. “In 2024, if you’re producing results, no one’s going to see anything wrong with it.”

A financial adviser at a major Wall Street bank who competes on the amateur circuit told me he completes 90% of his tasks by 10 a.m. because he manages long-term investment plans that change infrequently. The rest of his workday often involves golfing with clients and prospects. He’s a member of a private club with a multiyear waiting list, and people jump at the chance to join him on a course they normally can’t access.

There is an art to bringing in business this way. He never initiates shoptalk, telling his playing partners the round is about having fun and getting to know each other. They can’t resist asking about investment strategies by the back nine, he says.

Work hard, play hard

Matt Parziale golfed professionally on minor-league tours for several years, but when his dream of making the big time ended, he had to get a regular job. He became a firefighter, like his dad.

A few years later he won one of the biggest amateur tournaments in the country, earning spots in the 2018 Masters and U.S. Open, where he tied for first among non-pros.

The brush with celebrity brought introductions to business types that Parziale, 35 years old, says he wouldn’t have met otherwise. One connection led to a job with a large insurance broker. In 2022 he jumped to Deland, Gibson Insurance Associates in Wellesley, Mass., which recognised his golf game as a tool to help win large accounts.

He rescheduled our interview because he was hosting clients at a private club on Cape Cod, and squeezed me in the next morning, before teeing off with a business group in Newport, R.I.

A short time ago, Parziale couldn’t imagine making a living this way. Now he’s the norm in elite amateur golf circles.

“I look around at the guys at the events I play, and they all have these jobs ,” he says.

His boss, Chief Executive Chip Gibson, says Parziale is good at bringing in business because he puts as much effort into building relationships as honing his game. A golf outing is merely an opportunity to build trust that can eventually lead to a deal, and it’s a misconception that people who golf during work hours don’t work hard, he says.

Barry Allison’s single-digit handicap is an asset in his role as a management consultant at Accenture , where he specialises in travel and hospitality. He splits time between Washington, D.C., and The Villages, Fla., a golf mecca that boasts more than 50 courses.

It can be hard to get to know people in distributed work environments, he says. Go golfing and you’ll learn a lot about someone’s temperament—especially after a bad shot.

“If you see a guy snap a club over his knee, you don’t know what he’s going to snap next,” Allison says.

Special access

On a recent afternoon I was a lunch guest at Brae Burn Country Club, a private enclave outside Boston that was the site of U.S. Golf Association championships won by legends like Walter Hagen and Bobby Jones. I parked in the second lot because the first one was full—on a Wednesday.

My host was Cullen Onstott, managing director of the Onstott Group executive search firm and a former collegiate golfer at Fairfield University. He explained one reason companies prize excellent golfers is they can put well-practiced swings on autopilot and devote most of their attention to chitchat.

It’s hard to talk with potential customers about their needs and interests when you’re hunting for errant shots in the woods. It’s also challenging if you show off.

The first hole at Brae Burn is a 318-yard par 4 that slopes down, enabling big hitters like Onstott to reach the putting green in a single stroke. But to stay close to his playing partners and keep the conversation flowing, he sometimes hits a shorter shot.

Having an “in” at an exclusive club can make you a catch. Bo Burch, an executive recruiter in North Carolina, says clubs in his region tend to attract members according to their business sectors. One might be chock-full of real-estate investors while another has potential buyers of industrial manufacturing equipment.

Burch looks for candidates who are members of clubs that align with his clients’ industries, though he stresses that business acumen comes first when filling positions.

Tami McQueen, a former Division I tennis player and current chief marketing officer at Atlanta investment firm BIP Capital, signed up for private golf lessons this year. She had noticed colleagues were wearing polos with course logos and bringing their clubs to work. She wanted in.

McQueen joined business associates on the golf course for the first time in March at the PGA National Resort in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. She has lowered her handicap to a respectable 26 and says her new skill lends a professional edge.

“To be able to say, ‘I can play with you and we can have those business meetings on the course’ definitely opens a lot more doors,” she says.

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